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Intel Xeon to hit 2.4GHz in 2002

Tualatin to replace Coppermine too

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Intel Roadmap Prestonia, the 0.13 micron Xeon die-shrink, will ship during Q1 2002 at 2.2GHz before rising to 2.4GHz during the following quarter.

That's according to the latest leaked addition to Intel's dual-processor server chip roadmap, posted over at Web site Digit Life.

Prestonia is the successor to Foster, the first Xeon based on the Pentium 4 architecture. Foster was supposed to have shipped last week, but last-minute chip-packaging problems forced Intel to put back the release to late May. Prestonia will use a new chipset, codenamed Plumas.

As our previous roadmap showed, four- and eight-way Xeons will ship in Q1 2002 at over 1.6GHz, with 512KB (four-way) or 1MB (eight-way) of on-die L3 cache and supported by ServerWorks (four-way) and Enabled (eight-way) chipsets.

Come Q4 2002, however, Intel will launch Gallatin to replace these multi-way Xeons.

For dual-processor servers, Tualatin, the 0.13 Pentium III Xeon die-shrink, will replace Coppermine PIII Xeons over time. Eventually, the 0.13 micron PIII Xeon will be replaced by the 0.18 micron Xeon (in some sectors of the market) and later by the 0.13 micron Xeon (Prestonia). ®

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Related Link

Digit Life: Intel Future Plans Update

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