Feeds

Chip sales slip 7% in March

Americas worst hit

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Worldwide semiconductor sales slipped seven per cent in March as the industry waited for oversupply to dry up.

Chip sales were $14.4 billion for the month, compared to $15.48 billion in February, according to a report from the Semiconductor Industry Association.

In March 2000 worldwide sales were $15.07 billion.

"Since last November, we have witnessed worldwide semiconductor sales continually decline due to an inventory overhang and macroeconomic factors," stated SIA president, George Scalise.

Compared to the previous March, chip sales fell in all geographical areas except Japan. Revenues dropped 10.6 per cent to $4.1 billion in the Americas, 10.4 per cent to $3.4 billion in Asia Pacific, and 0.7 per cent to $3.3 billion in Europe.

In Japan sales grew seven per cent to $3.6 billion.

The SIA expects semiconductor sales to grow 17 per cent in 2001, around half of last year's figure.

"We continue to believe that the industry will complete the inventory correction in the third quarter and the recovery will commence in the fourth quarter," said Scalise. ®

Related Stories

World chip sales down 7% in February
Chip industry faces almost zero growth in 2001
SIA admits 2001 chip growth forecasts won't be met

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.