Feeds

Google restores Usenet archive, plans posting

So that's where the DAT went

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

The Power of One Brief: Top reasons to choose HP BladeSystem

Google overnight yanked the Deja backup tape out from under the Foosball table, where it had been propping up that wobbly leg, and now much of Deja's historic Usenet archive is online again.

Google also plans to add the ability to post Usenet message by mid-May, company spokesman David Krane told us.

The company took enormous heat in February when it acquired the Deja archive, but failed to replace its web front end. Within weeks however, a beta replacement added threading capabilities, which while not quite replacing the functionality of the Deja UI at least introduced Google's famed speed. So you could get not-very-far, very fast, jibed cynics.

And there's no pleasing some people. "Until they have threading by message ID (ANY threading at all, please) it is kind of pointless to try to follow a discussion. Until the basic search sorts by date instead of relevance, you'll get a jumble of messages from 1995, 2000, 1998, 1997, conveniently mixed up for your perusal," notes a posted over at Slashdot.

Krane says Google is still working on UI improvements, so if you have a suggestion, let them know. A core team of fewer than ten is working on the beta service, out of around 200 employees. The Deja archive represents over a terabyte of data, he says.

Long-term campaigner for a good home for the archive, Netizens author and Internet historian Ronda Hauben is scheduled to give a lecture entitled Usenet and the Usenet Archives The Challenges of Building A Collaborative Technical Community at nearby Stanford University on May 23. The event as originally floated, was to be a two-handed with Google CEO Larry Page. Now it seems Larry will out of town that day, which saves us a fortune in additional flame retardant clothing, we guess.

However we can banish the fear that the archive was lost for good. At least it wasn't propping up the aquarium. ®

Related Stories

Netizens blinded by 'half-assed' Google stunt
Deja UI too costly to save, Google boss tells Reg
Readers Letters My Google Usenet - wrong or right?
Deja geeks leave amusing sub-domains for new Google master
Open access challenge to Google

The Essential Guide to IT Transformation

More from The Register

next story
Secure microkernel that uses maths to be 'bug free' goes open source
Hacker-repelling, drone-protecting code will soon be yours to tweak as you see fit
KDE releases ice-cream coloured Plasma 5 just in time for summer
Melty but refreshing - popular rival to Mint's Cinnamon's still a work in progress
NO MORE ALL CAPS and other pleasures of Visual Studio 14
Unpicking a packed preview that breaks down ASP.NET
Cheer up, Nokia fans. It can start making mobes again in 18 months
The real winner of the Nokia sale is *drumroll* ... Nokia
Put down that Oracle database patch: It could cost $23,000 per CPU
On-by-default INMEMORY tech a boon for developers ... as long as they can afford it
Another day, another Firefox: Version 31 is upon us ALREADY
Web devs, Mozilla really wants you to like this one
Google shows off new Chrome OS look
Athena springs full-grown from Chromium project's head
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Application security programs and practises
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Securing Web Applications Made Simple and Scalable
Learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.