Feeds

London police pilot PKI

Scotland Yard smiles on smartcards for secure access

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

The Metropolitan Police have chosen digital certificate technology from Baltimore Technologies to bolster the security of remote access to sensitive police information.

Baltimore's Unicert Public Key Infrastructure (PKI) system will be used to ensure only trusted users can look up information on police databases, and that a record of transactions is kept. It will be used in addition to the London force's existing security systems.

The technology, which involves issuing police workers with digital certificates on smart cards, will initially be used to authenticate access to an unnamed application for 3,000 users. Remote workers can gain access to this application over a secure Virtual Private Network (VPN) and the Met will use middleware from Kyberpass, called eBusiness TrustPlatform, to control access over the encrypted links it will use.

It's hoped over time that future applications using digital certificates, such as secure email and other database applications, will be rolled out to the entire 50,000 strong police force.

Michael Baker, government account manager at Baltimore Technologies, said the Met had previously used network-level security mechanisms to access databases. The new system will provide complete end-to-end security.

Baltimore's Technology meets the UK government's security requirements (it has ITSEC E3 level certification), and this was one of the main reasons The Met selected Unicert in preference to competing PKI technologies.

News of the deal, worth an unspecified amount, is a boost for Baltimore, which earlier this month issued a profit warning that its customers were postponing decisions to buy its software.

PKI technology is considered important for the future of ebusiness but implementation often involves changing the business process within organisation, and this coupled with the cost of the software can make rolling out the technology successfully an expensive proposition. ®

Related Stories

Baltimore/AppGate go for public access to company networks
Baltimore issues profits warning
London Police in URL ownership row

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
Goog says patch⁵⁰ your Chrome
64-bit browser loads cat vids FIFTEEN PERCENT faster!
Chinese hackers spied on investigators of Flight MH370 - report
Classified data on flight's disappearance pinched
NIST to sysadmins: clean up your SSH mess
Too many keys, too badly managed
Scratched PC-dispatch patch patched, hatched in batch rematch
Windows security update fixed after triggering blue screens (and screams) of death
Researchers camouflage haxxor traps with fake application traffic
Honeypots sweetened to resemble actual workloads, complete with 'secure' logins
Attack flogged through shiny-clicky social media buttons
66,000 users popped by malicious Flash fudging add-on
prev story

Whitepapers

Top 10 endpoint backup mistakes
Avoid the ten endpoint backup mistakes to ensure that your critical corporate data is protected and end user productivity is improved.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up distributed data
Eliminating the redundant use of bandwidth and storage capacity and application consolidation in the modern data center.
The essential guide to IT transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIOs automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.