Dell steals Compaq's crown

Top PC vendor in Q1

Dell became the world's top selling PC vendor in Q1, netting 13 per cent market share.

Despite a quarter of sluggish PC sales growth across the industry in general, the direct computer seller saw shipments rise 30 per cent to 4.1 million. Meanwhile, the world's PC shipments grew less than three per cent compared to Q1 the previous year, a survey by IDC found.

Total worldwide PC shipments reached 31.6 million amid the market slump.

Compaq was forced into second place after shipments dropped 4.7 per cent to 3.8 million for the quarter. This gave the US vendor twelve per cent market share. Hewlett-Packard also saw unit sales fall 4.4 per cent, with 2.4 million shipments and 7.5 per cent of the market.

IBM shipments rose 7 per cent to 2 million, giving it 6.3 per cent market share, while Fujitsu Siemens' sales were down 1 per cent at 1.8 million. It grabbed 5.6 per cent market share.

Sales in the US actually dropped 9.5 per cent to 10.5 million units during the quarter. "After a cold holiday season in 2000, the US consumer market hardened into a deep freeze going into the first quarter, adding to normal seasonal effects," said IDC research manager for PC hardware Roger Kay.

"Those companies with greatest exposure to the US consumer desktop business were most punished by the arctic market winds."

Dell stayed well ahead of rivals in the US market, "with its heavier commercial mix and garrotting pricing strategies," according to IDC. It managed to grow its PC shipments 28 per cent during the quarter to 2.6 million. The US giant now has almost a quarter of this market - ten per cent ahead of its nearest rival Compaq.

"The slowdown still appears focused on the US market, although other regions are by no means in the clear," said IDC worldwide quarterly tracker director Loren Loverde. "Businesses and consumers alike are holding back." ®

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