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Mobo makers turn backs on Rambus development

Eagerly awaiting DDR-based Pentium 4 chipsets

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Taiwanese motherboard makers have stopped developing Rambus RDRAM, Pentium 4-based products in preparation for a shift toward DDR SDRAM - despite Intel's vigorous April price cuts, DigiTimes has reported.

At issue is a fall in Q1 sales of Socket 423 P4s. Sales of the part missed expectations by around 50 per cent. Mobo makers reckon the arrival of Socket 478 P4s will swing things around, so that's the platform they are now dedicating their development efforts to.

Socket 478 P4s have already begun sampling, primarily to pave the way for Intel's PC-133 Brookdale chipset, due Q3, but also for DDR-supporting chipsets from SIS, Acer Labs and VIA. Brookdale-based mobos are expected to ship in Q3, according to plan, mobo makers Gigabyte and MSI told DigiTimes. Intel has been sampling Brookdale chips since the beginning of the year. ®

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