Feeds

Siemens pulls plug on Net over power cables technology

Cites regulatory and 'political' problems

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Build a business case: developing custom apps

Siemens has said it is pulling the plug on development of a technology that can allow the transmission of Internet traffic of power cables.

The giant German electronics and engineering group said it saw a greater potential market in developing ADSL products instead, mainly because of regulatory delays surrounding powerline technology.

"Because of regulatory delays, there is no chance of an immediate mass market application for this technology," a Siemens spokesman told Reuters. He added that Siemens was keeping its options open about re-entering the market at some future date but, for now, saw growth of the market for powerline technology as "uncertain".

Siemen's move parallels a decision more than a year ago by development partners Nortel and utility Norweb to drop development of digital power line (DPL) technology in the UK. That decision was made against a backdrop of fears that the technology could drown out other radio traffic and interfere with civil aviation and emergency service transmissions.

The technology encountered particularly fierce opposition for radio hams. The Low Power Radio Association (LPRA) described powerline technology, which was been tested in the north of England in 1998, as causing "alarming levels of interference".

"Eavesdropping aliens and the industrial archaeologists of the future may well wonder why we built a phased array across the north of England to beam credit card numbers and digital images of naked ladies into the atmosphere," Nick Long of the LPRA memorably said at the time.

Thus far the technology, which allows symmetrical connection of between 1Mbps to 3Mbps between a base station and homes, has been far more favourably received in Germany. A number of German utilities plan to launch small-scale commercial broadband services this Summer, when laws regulating the use of the technology enter the country's statute books.

Among these German utility EnBW, which planned to roll out Siemens kit in order to provide Internet access via the main to 7,500 houses in the south west German town of Ellwangen. EnBW, which is due to update press on its progress with the technology during the CeBIT computer fair which begins in Hanover tomorrow, will now use kit supplied by Swiss group Ascom. ®

Related stories

Nortel/Norweb pulls plug on Internet over electricity scheme

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
So, Apple won't sell cheap kit? Prepare the iOS garden wall WRECKING BALL
It can throw the low cost race if it looks to the cloud
Time Warner Cable customers SQUEAL as US network goes offline
A rude awakening: North Americans greeted with outage drama
Shoot-em-up: Sony Online Entertainment hit by 'large scale DDoS attack'
Games disrupted as firm struggles to control network
BT customers face broadband and landline price hikes
Poor punters won't be affected, telecoms giant claims
EE plonks 4G in UK Prime Minister's backyard
OK, his constituency. Brace yourself for EXTRA #selfies
prev story

Whitepapers

Top 10 endpoint backup mistakes
Avoid the ten endpoint backup mistakes to ensure that your critical corporate data is protected and end user productivity is improved.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up distributed data
Eliminating the redundant use of bandwidth and storage capacity and application consolidation in the modern data center.
The essential guide to IT transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIOs automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.