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Burglars pinch PC with EastEnders plots

BBC says who shot Phil mystery is still safe

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The BBC has denied that the secret of who shot EastEnders' Phil Mitchell could leak out after the computer of a script writer for the soap was stolen.

Computer equipment and a hard disk containing storylines was taken during a burglary of the writer's Clapham, London home.

A spokesman for the BBC said the broadcaster took "appropriate security" so that plotlines could not be recovered, but refused to say what encryption or other security technology it used to do this.

According to a story in today's London Evening Standard newspaper, the information on the stolen computer did not relate directly to who shot Phil but it did contain details of future scripts that might allow someone to piece together the identity of the killer.

Despite this the BBC firmly deny that the purpose of the burglary was to find out who shot Phil.

"The implication that this computer was stolen in order to recover information for publication is ridiculous. Any UK publication would refuse to buy stolen information and none would publish details of the storyline," the BBC spokesman told The Register.

The scriptwriter involved is said to be very upset about what is reported to be the latest in a number of break-ins at the property. A police and private security firm are said to be helping make sure she does not become a victim of similar crimes again.

More than 17 million people watched the episode of EastEnders in which shaken headed hardman Phil, played by Steve McFadden, was shot. The plotline is promoted by BBC as the biggest TV whodunnit since the "Who shot JR?" mystery of Dallas.

Viewers are due to find out who shot Phil sometime in April. ®

External links

Evening Standard story

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