Feeds

UK to test mobile digital signatures

Govt project a proving ground for m-commerce

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Security for virtualized datacentres

The Government is to conduct the UK's first secure mobile electronic signature trial in a scheme that will go some way to proving whether mobile mcommerce is a viable business proposition, or just the latest fad.

From next month, staff at the Radiocommunications Agency will use digital certificate technology to submit expense claims by mobile phones.

During the trial 50 employees of the Department of Trade and Industry agency will complete and electronically sign their travel or subsistence forms using a Vodafone supplied Siemens C35i digital GSM mobile phone.

When prompted, users will enter a PIN number to release a cryptographic signature held on the phone's smartcard. This signature will be used to encode data sent so that its recipient can be sure any message has not been tampered with.

We've long harboured our doubts about the hype surrounding mobile commerce but at least this trial features a mildy useful application instead of some far-fetched notion of using location-based services to order cups of coffee.

Furthermore Vodafone sees the Government trial for the kind of scheme it would like to introduce to the wider business community and eventually the public, so the success or otherwise of the project will provide some important pointers for the future.

Vodafone plans to make mobile telephones featuring digital signature technology commercially available later this year after proving the technology through the Radiocommunications Agency project and other trials.

Paul Donovan, the commercial managing director at Vodafone, said: "Using information contained on their SIM smartcard, present in mobile phones, Vodafone customers will have the potential to use their mobile device whenever and wherever they currently use their signature." ®

Related Stories

Mobile monsters make m-commerce world domination bid
Don't believe the m-commerce hype
Vodafone seeks Sony help with mobile gaming

Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet

More from The Register

next story
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
JINGS! Microsoft Bing called Scots indyref RIGHT!
Redmond sporran metrics get one in the ten ring
Driving with an Apple Watch could land you with a £100 FINE
Bad news for tech-addicted fanbois behind the wheel
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
Sony says year's losses will be FOUR TIMES DEEPER than thought
Losses of more than $2 BILLION loom over troubled Japanese corp
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Why Oracle CEO Larry Ellison had to go ... Except he hasn't
Silicon Valley's veteran seadog in piratical Putin impression
Big Content Australia just blew a big hole in its credibility
AHEDA's research on average content prices did not expose methodology, so appears less than rigourous
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.