Feeds

Transmeta ships, renames Mobile Linux

Midori, anyone?

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

Transmeta's Linux-on-Crusoe project, Mobile Linux, has been renamed and handed over to the open source world.

Of course, Transmeta was always obliged to release Midori's source code, as per the terms of the GNU Public Licence, which determines how Linux and derived code may be released.

Mobile Linux, announced back in January 2000 when Transmeta officially launched its Crusoe CPU, always looked like the company's attempt to provide would-be chip buyers with the basis to build systems based on its processors.

At the time, Linus Torvalds, Linux creators and Transmeta staffer, said there wouldn't ever be a Transmeta distro, and while the software hasn't been renamed 'Transmeta Linux', it remains trademarked to the hilt.

The new name is Midori, the Japanese word for green, "chosen to reflect the environmentally friendly aspects of an energy efficient Linux operating system", Transmeta said.

We don't know about "energy efficient", but it's certainly space efficient. The compressed kernel weighs in a just 36KB, though applications will increase the storage space required considerably. It compiles on Red Hat and Debian distros - it's actually derived from Debian - and runs on x86 and Crusoe CPUs.

The version is 1.0.0 beta 1, so it's clearly still a work in progress.

But why make such a deal over what after all is just one more embedded version of Linux? Probably because the software has done it's job as a teaser for Transmeta's CPUs - a way of making it easier for device makers to be persuaded to buy Transmeta chips. A year or so on, and the Midori Web site lists only two Midori-based devices that have actually shipped - Gateway's AOL Net appliance and Hitachi's Flora Net access terminal. Certainly most Transmeta-based machines run Windows in the chip's x86-emulation mode.

It seems likely that Transmeta has found that Midori has made relatively little difference in customers' decisions to opt for Crusoe, and with its role as a marketing tool much diminished, it may as well hand the code over to all and sundry. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Microsoft WINDOWS 10: Seven ATE Nine. Or Eight did really
Windows NEIN skipped, tech preview due out on Wednesday
Business is back, baby! Hasta la VISTA, Win 8... Oh, yeah, Windows 9
Forget touchscreen millennials, Microsoft goes for mouse crowd
Apple: SO sorry for the iOS 8.0.1 UPDATE BUNGLE HORROR
Apple kills 'upgrade'. Hey, Microsoft. You sure you want to be like these guys?
ARM gives Internet of Things a piece of its mind – the Cortex-M7
32-bit core packs some DSP for VIP IoT CPU LOL
Microsoft on the Threshold of a new name for Windows next week
Rebranded OS reportedly set to be flung open by Redmond
Lotus Notes inventor Ozzie invents app to talk to people on your phone
Imagine that. Startup floats with voice collab app for Win iPhone
'Google is NOT the gatekeeper to the web, as some claim'
Plus: 'Pretty sure iOS 8.0.2 will just turn the iPhone into a fax machine'
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.