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SiS, VIA and Acer intro Tualatin chipsets

Readying mobo support for chip's Q3 debut

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Taiwanese chipset maker SiS has begun work on two chipsets designed to support Intel's upcoming 0.13 micron, copper interconnect revision of the Pentium III, codenamed Tualatin.

VIA is working on one too, as is Acer Labs, Taiwan's business paper, the Commercial Times has reported.

Tualatin is due to ship early Q3 at 1.13GHz and 1.26GHz clock speeds to fill the gap between the 1.13GHz Coppermine PIII and the 1.4GHz Pentium 4. Tualatin supports a 133MHz frontside bus. Intel is expected to announce Tualatin pricing this month, but we reckon you're looking at between $268 and $316 per chip in batches of 1000.

SiS has two Tualatin-supporting chipsets in the works: the 633T and the 635T. The 633T supports PC133 SDRAM, to which the 635T adds support for 200MHz and 2667MHz DDR SDRAM.

VIA's part is called the 694T; Acer's the M1651T.

Intel itself will be supporting Tualatin with a B-step upgrade to its 815 family of PIII and Celeron chipsets. ®

Related Link

SiS 635T announcement release

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