Feeds

Australia outlaws e-mail forwarding

Way over the top down under

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

The essential guide to IT transformation

Outrageously strict Internet copyright laws which have just gone into effect throughout Australia make it illegal to forward an e-mail memo without the author's permission, and could result in fines of $60,000 or five years in the slam, according to a story by the Aussie Sunday Telegraph.

"It's quite possible that the forwarding of an e-mail could be a technical infringement of copyright," an unnamed legal advisor to Oz Attorney General Daryl Williams told the paper.

"E-mailing is a 'communication' under the Digital Agenda Act, and so is putting something up on a Web site," the source added.

This could rank as the world's most copyright-friendly and common-sense-hostile piece of legislation yet devised.

And that's not all: Aussies recently revealed a widespread national neurosis by entertaining, in the state of South Australia, an Internet censorship bill which would criminalize the posting any material which cops deem offensive to children - that's anything, anywhere.

The bill would require Net content to be child-friendly according to the country's movie certification scheme; but, in a twist straight out of Kafka, it's not possible for Webmasters to get their sites reviewed by the relevant authority before they get busted.

Which is to say nothing of the lunacy of reducing on-line discourse and dialogue to infant babble. Clearly, the Puritanical delight in censoring impure thoughts and regulating the pleasure of others has once again got out of control down under.

Over half a century ago the English writer Norman Douglas had occasion to observe that "all mankind is at the mercy of a handful of neurotics".

So much for progress. ®

Story Update

Aussie AG denies e-mail penalty, sort of

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
Banking apps: Handy, can grab all your money... and RIDDLED with coding flaws
Yep, that one place you'd hoped you wouldn't find 'em
No, thank you. I will not code for the Caliphate
Some assignments, even the Bongster decline must
Barnes & Noble: Swallow a Samsung Nook tablet, please ... pretty please
Novelslab finally on sale with ($199 - $20) price tag
Ballmer leaves Microsoft board to spend more time with his b-balls
From Clippy to Clippers: Hi, I see you're running an NBA team now ...
Video of US journalist 'beheading' pulled from social media
Yanked footage featured British-accented attacker and US journo James Foley
Primetime precrime? Minority Report TV series 'being developed'
I have to know. I have to find out what happened to my life
Broadband slow and expensive? Blame Telstra says CloudFlare
Won't peer, will gouge for Internet transit
Netflix swallows yet another bitter pill, inks peering deal with TWC
Net neutrality crusader once again pays up for priority access
prev story

Whitepapers

A new approach to endpoint data protection
What is the best way to ensure comprehensive visibility, management, and control of information on both company-owned and employee-owned devices?
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Maximize storage efficiency across the enterprise
The HP StoreOnce backup solution offers highly flexible, centrally managed, and highly efficient data protection for any enterprise.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.