Feeds

Miramax in movie pay per view Net play

Experiment

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

Miramax, the Hollywood film studio, is to offer full-length feature films for rent over the Internet, in an experiment designed to test consumer demand for pay-per-view services.

Next Monday, Miramax will flog its 1999 release Guinevere for $3.49 - the first of 12 feature films it intends to make available on the Internet. The movie is 500MB big and takes an estimated 30 minutes to download on a high-speed connection.

It will be available from Miramax.com, Sightsound.com and the film's home site.

Once downloaded the movie can be viewed only for 24 hours, although details of the digital rights management technology used to do are sketchy.

Guinevere, which is directed by Audrey Wells and stars Stephen Rea, charts the events after a young girl from an affluent family rebels and becomes involved with a much older photographer.

It's not exactly the jewel of the Disney subsidiary's back catalogue, which also includes films like The Cider House Rules and Shakespeare in Love, but the PPV is an interesting experiment from a movie industry - which is desperately seeking ways of extracting revenues from films downloaded over the Net.

Here in Britain, broadband ISP and video-on-demand outfits such as HomeChoice offer films over the Internet, and content providers like BSkyB are piloting video on demand scheme - but the involvement of Hollywood is still interesting.

Protection

So far, film studios have directed most of their energy at attempting to shut down file-sharing services, such as Scour.com.

Hollywood, in the shape of the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA), also called in the lawyers to bring in to court Web sites which hyperlinked to sites hosting DeCSS, a DVD crack that unscrambles the CSS copy protection facility on disks.

Ostensibly, this was done to defend against Napster-style copyright infringements, although little evidence of piracy was offered in court. But the move raised hackles in the hacker community - particularly as DeCSS was developed as part of a project to develop a DVD driver for Linux.

In a separate move, developers of the hacker video technology DivX have released much of their work to the open source community, under a scheme called Project Mayo. DivX is a way to create and send extremely high-quality video files online and is touted by some as the technology that could do for video online what MP3 did for music.

Based on the MP4 format, DivX does not in itself break copyright protection. But this has not stopped Hollywood suits from slating it in court and elsewhere. ®

Related stories

Hollywood 1: Hackers 0
Mythology dominates MPAA strategy in DVD trial
Disney's Eisner solves Net piracy problem
ADSL killed the Video Store
MPAA, RIAA sue Scour over copyrights
Scour to stop Napster-style movie sharing service
HomeChoice in DDOS blitz

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

More from The Register

next story
Brits: Google, can you scrape 60k pages from web, pleeease
Hey, c'mon Choc Factory, it's our 'right to be forgotten'
Of COURSE Stephen Elop's to blame for Nokia woes, says author
'Google did have some unique propositions for Nokia'
FCC, Google cast eye over millimetre wireless
The smaller the wave, the bigger 5G's chances of success
It's even GRIMMER up North after MEGA SKY BROADBAND OUTAGE
By 'eck! Eccles cake production thrown into jeopardy
Mobile coverage on trains really is pants
You thought it was just *insert your provider here*, but now we have numbers
Don't mess with Texas ('cos it's getting Google Fiber and you're not)
A bit late, but company says 1Gbps Austin network almost ready to compete with AT&T
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.