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Phone-call dentist guilty of manslaughter

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The dental surgeon whose patient died while he chatted on his mobile phone has been given a suspended sentence.

Richard Kaul, a 36-year old anaesthetist, was found guilty of manslaughter and given a six-month jail sentence, suspended for a year.

He was talking on his cell phone instead of monitoring his patient, 56 year-old Isatu Bangura, who had insisted on being anaesthetised before a minor dental procedure.

Kaul told his nurse to switch off the blood oxygen monitor because it was annoying, the jury heard. Bangura later had a heart attack and died in hospital, six days later.

In his ruling, Judge Neil Denison said: "This is not a case for an immediate sentence of imprisonment. Your professional life is in ruins and that in itself is a severe punishment." He told Kaul that his conduct represented a "serious lapse" from his usual standards.

Five of Bangura's six children were in court for the verdict. They said they were satisfied that justice had been done.

More phone mayhem

A Stagecoach bus driver is facing disciplinary action after he spent an entire bus journey sending and receiving text messages on his cell phone.

Passengers said that the bus was lurching along its route, and passed several stops even though people had rung the bell to get off.

One woman told The Mirror: "He was texting all the way. The bus was packed and it was very frightening." She said she was frightened she would be put off the bus if she complained to the driver.

The news comes less than ten days after Paul Browning was given five years in prison for running down and killing Paul Hammond, while writing text messages and driving.

Yet another example of the amplifying effect technology has on human stupidity. ®

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