Q: Wtf is a moot?

A: It's a 3-legged turkey used for measuring bridges

Flame of the week MOOT wtf is a MOOT?

On the matter of this week's flame, Dave Parsons of Nashville was good enough to offer an apology for his fellow countryman. In reality, we don't know if the flamer's from the US or not. Nevertheless, we accept your apology:

On behalf of Americans with a brain cell or two and an actual grasp of the English language, I would like to apologize for Tony La.

I assure you we will take him out back, beat a confession of who showed him a computer, and then execute him, his cohorts, and his family for the sake of the human gene pool.

Thanks. You're doing the Lord's work. Now, wtf is a 'moot' anyway? Toby Doig offered a source of enlightenment:

I thought you were taking the piss at first with this flame, but then I remembered that Americans can see the site too. Course, not saying that the Brits can claim much in the way of intelligence (yes, Sun readers, that's you).

Anyway, as a suggestion, howsabout putting a link to dictionary.com so that people can check out the definition without having to type in the dictionary address and the offending word themselves. Interestingly, it seems that the word "moot" originated in legal discourse but has transgressed into common English dialogue although its original true meaning appears to have transmogrified.

Or, in less poncy language, get yo bitch ass over this link and take a big waz at the snorky lowdown 'bout a half-pint dahn the page. innit.

Gawd bless yer Tobe mate. That's for your academics, though. We like Roy Howard's definition better:

A MOOT is a medium sized three legged turkey. It runs extremely quickly and can appear to vanish in a trice. A trice is a small three wheeled vehicle.

And Erik Trent thinks he's found a related comedy word:

As an interesting side issue. If your are unaware of it do a little research on a unit of measure called a smoot.

It was something a bunch of bored Harvard rich kids came up with. Basically they had this guy who's last name was Smoot and used him to measure a bridge in Boston. It has since been developed into a semi-accepted unit of measurement. For humorous purposes anyways.

We got another couple of emails calling this unit a 'moot'. Clarification anyone?

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