Feeds

Open Source ‘stifles’ innovation

Thanks for the warning, Microsoft

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

A Microsoft bigwig has gone on record today claiming that open source code will stifle innovation. He said that the threat from open source needs to be taken on board by legislators.

Can this possibly be right? It sounds like he just got hold of the oppositions' script and changed a few words around. Isn't this what Linux fans have been saying for years about proprietary software?

Well, it might sound strange to us, but OS chief Jim Allchin (a relative of Jimmy Hill perhaps?) says that freely distributed code actually threatens intellectual property rights, and could hinder R&D spending.

In an entirely unconvincing rant about the evils of freely distributed code, Allchin said: "I'm an American, I believe in the American Way," he said. "I worry if the government encourages open source, and I don't think we've done enough education of policymakers to understand the threat."

So, what are you saying Jim? That it is the American way to keep anything that is valuable a secret, or that American policy makers are so dim-witted that they can't grasp the concept of co-operative collaboration?

Either way, the open source community is not convinced.

Brian Behlendorf, founder of CollabNet, told reporters at Bloomberg: "I think Microsoft is trying to paint the open-source community as being fascist; that all software has to be free, or none of it can be."

He suggested that Allchin might have misunderstood the open source model, saying that most open source companies kept some intellectual property rights to their material.

Allchin rounded off his thoughts on the matter with the immortal line: "We can build a better product than Linux. There is always something enamoring about thinking you can get something for free."

We thought this cartoon over at Userfriendly was appropriate. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
PEAK APPLE: iOS 8 is least popular Cupertino mobile OS in all of HUMAN HISTORY
'Nerd release' finally staggers past 50 per cent adoption
Microsoft to bake Skype into IE, without plugins
Redmond thinks the Object Real-Time Communications API for WebRTC is ready to roll
Microsoft promises Windows 10 will mean two-factor auth for all
Sneak peek at security features Redmond's baking into new OS
Mozilla: Spidermonkey ATE Apple's JavaScriptCore, THRASHED Google V8
Moz man claims the win on rivals' own benchmarks
Yes, Virginia, there IS a W3C HTML5 standard – as of now, that is
You asked for it! You begged for it! Then you gave up! And now it's HERE!
FTDI yanks chip-bricking driver from Windows Update, vows to fight on
Next driver to battle fake chips with 'non-invasive' methods
DEATH by PowerPoint: Microsoft warns of 0-day attack hidden in slides
Might put out patch in update, might chuck it out sooner
Ubuntu 14.10 tries pulling a Steve Ballmer on cloudy offerings
Oi, Windows, centOS and openSUSE – behave, we're all friends here
prev story

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
New hybrid storage solutions
Tackling data challenges through emerging hybrid storage solutions that enable optimum database performance whilst managing costs and increasingly large data stores.
Mitigating web security risk with SSL certificates
Web-based systems are essential tools for running business processes and delivering services to customers.