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Blue Men back again for Intel

P4 gets the push

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Previously on The Reg, we have said rude things about Intel's Blue Man Group campaign, in particular suggesting that the person responsible for the idea may have consumed a quantity of banned substances.

However, the top brass at Chipzilla HQ clearly love the BMG, because they are back in a new series of TV ads.

Starting on 19 February the performance artists will be doing things with the number four, to their own musical composition. It will hit the UK on March 1. According to the Intel PR blurb, this will "raise awareness and excitement" about the new processor, but it sounds a bit like an idea for a Sesame Street show to us.

The funny thing about the Blue Man adverts was that until someone here at Vulture Central pointed them out to me, I hadn't noticed that they were for Intel processors. They just got filed away in the strange advert folder in the back of my brain.

In general, I've got no bone to pick with people who want to cover themselves in paint and hurl themselves at walls. Do whatever you gotta do to be happy, however daft you look doing it. ®

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