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Toshiba bets on Rambus

Set to triple RDRAM production

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Toshiba says it will triple production of Rambus DRAM memory chips in anticipation of demand for more powerful computers following the launch of the P4.

It said the production increase was on target for September, by which time RDRAM would account for 60 per cent of its total output - a total of eight million units per month. At the moment, at 2.3 million units, it only accounts for 20 per cent.

The manufacturer said the move would not cost a fortune, and added that it was also planning to halve production of lower speed DRAM to five million units, monthly.

Currently the Japanese company produces chips destined mainly for the PS2 consoles, so its plans to make more RDRAM chips represents something of a shift of focus. However, since the controversial memory is the only stuff that will work with Intel's P4, it is likely to be a good bet. ®

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