Auction software pirate signs public confession

He's 'very sorry'

A US software pirate who used online auctions to tout his wares has been forced into making a public signed confession by the SIIA.

Julian Kish said he was "very sorry" for what he had done, adding that he had been "in a financially bad position and I thought I could make a quick buck".

In a Stalinist Great Purge type of public apology, he added "I would urge other software pirates to think long and hard about any unlawful activities they are performing."

The SIIA published this letter, apparently penned by Kish, along with a press statement saying it had allowed Kish to make a 'confidential payment' to settle the civil suit filed on behalf of Adobe Systems, Alias/Wavefront and Macromedia. It also ordered him not to infringe on copyright in the future.

The agreement came a fortnight after the anti-piracy body filed the suit, and saved Kish from its fiercer demands. He allegedly sold six software titles through auction sites to the SIIA at reduced prices, and the SIIA originally threatened him with $150,000 per violation.

"If I would have cooperated with them in the beginning this whole mistake would have been easier on me my family and my position at my company," the letter added. "I am sorry this happened and I am sorry that I lost my job over this as well. I am sorry to have taken from the very industry in which I am associated."

Peter Beruk, SIIA anti-piracy programs VP, said: "When sellers have the ability to offer unauthorised copies of software to unwitting customers, for little or no cost, we must move actively and decisively to stop this scourge that is impacting the high technology industry."

Kish's confession in full can be found here. ®

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