Feeds

Plan to charge for BIND security info

Closed forum being set up

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Top three mobile application threats

Following revelations about a serious security weakness, the group involved in administering the BIND domain name server software is considering charging for access to security-related information about the important Internet program.

The Internet Software Consortium (ISC) plans to create a forum that will only be open to itself, vendors that include BIND in products, root and top-level domain name server operators, and other "qualified parties" who ISC decides to admit.

Members, who will pay a membership fee and be obliged to sign non-disclosure agreements, will receive privileged early warnings of problems with BIND.

The idea runs counter to the spirit of open disclosure of security problems that has long existed amongst security professionals, and has attracted strong criticism on mailing lists, such as BugTraq, that it will make the impact of any vulnerabilities worse, and play into the hands of crackers.

BIND (Berkeley Internet Name Domain) is an open-source software program that has become the de-facto standard for Domain Name System (DNS) servers on the Internet. Around 80 per cent of DNS servers run BIND.

Last week, a notice outlining a series of severe security problems with BIND was posted by CERT. The advisory documents four vulnerabilities in BIND, including two buffer overflows that could allow attackers to remotely gain unrestricted access to machines running the program

In a interesting discussion on the issue of creating a fee-paying forum, available here, Paul Vixie of ISC, said that the organisation would still issue security through CERT, but felt that using the security clearing house as a way to discuss issues between vendors was awkward, hence the creation of a fee-paying forum. ®

Related story

BIND holes mean big trouble on the Net

Build a business case: developing custom apps

More from The Register

next story
Stick a 4K in them: Super high-res TVs are DONE
4,000 pixels is niche now... Don't say we didn't warn you
BBC goes offline in MASSIVE COCKUP: Stephen Fry partly muzzled
Auntie tight-lipped as major outage rolls on
iPad? More like iFAD: We reveal why Apple fell into IBM's arms
But never fear fanbois, you're still lapping up iPhones, Macs
Philip K Dick 'Nazi alternate reality' story to be made into TV series
Amazon Studios, Ridley Scott firm to produce The Man in the High Castle
Amazon Reveals One Weird Trick: A Loss On Almost $20bn In Sales
Investors really hate it: Share price plunge as growth SLOWS in key AWS division
Bose says today is F*** With Dre Day: Beats sued in patent battle
Music gear giant seeks some of that sweet, sweet Apple pie
There's NOTHING on TV in Europe – American video DOMINATES
Even France's mega subsidies don't stop US content onslaught
You! Pirate! Stop pirating, or we shall admonish you politely. Repeatedly, if necessary
And we shall go about telling people you smell. No, not really
Too many IT conferences to cover? MICROSOFT to the RESCUE!
Yet more word of cuts emerges from Redmond
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
Seven Steps to Software Security
Seven practical steps you can begin to take today to secure your applications and prevent the damages a successful cyber-attack can cause.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.