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Mobile PIII price cuts coming

'Back to school refresh'

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Intel Roadmap Update Intel will cut the price of the 1GHz and 900MHz Mobile Pentium III less than two months after its launch next March in what it calls a "back to school refresh".

The 1GHz part will launch at $772, falling $637 on 27 May. At the same time, the 900MHz chip will come down from a launch price of $562 to $423, after experiencing an interim cut to $508 on 15 April.

Two "low voltage" PIIIs, at 700MHz and 750MHz will both launch separately at $316. Not long after the 750MHz part debuts, the 700MHz chip's price will fall to $241, on 27 May. On that date, the 600MHz "low voltage" PIII will fall from this week's launch price of $241 to $198.

The "ultra-low voltage" 600MHz PIII will launch at $209 to replace the recently released 500MHz part.

Celeron pricing will remain largely unchanged. The 800MHz part, the 600MHz "low voltage" chip and the "ultra-low voltage" 600MHz Celeron will all launch late April/early May at $170, $134 and $144, respectively. ®

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