Feeds

Psion bid for big time wrecked by Motorola pullout

There goes the US bridgehead...

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

The collapse of Psion's joint venture with Motorola is major bad news for the British company, but isn't likely to cause significant ripples for the cuckoo in the Psion nest, Symbian. Yesterday Psion shares nosedived as the company confessed that Motorola had canned the jv, and that consequently Psion's all-in-one PDA/mobile phone would be knocked back to 2002 - plucky little Psion's bid for the big time therefore seems to be toast, for the moment.

Motorola remains a shareholder in Symbian, but that's a quite different matter from the jv with Psion. This was intended to produce a Motorola product this year, ahead of other Symbian-based smartphones, and the Psion version was to ship in a similar timeframe. So the two companies would have stolen a march on the rest of the market, while Motorola's Symbian products would have made it to market a year ahead of the Palm-based equivalent it was (and still is) also working on.

From what Psion CEO David Levin was telling The Register last year, that last feature of the deal was way up towards the top of the priority list. Psion sees itself as strong in Europe, but on Motorola's home US turf Palm has the mind and market share. In Psion's view Motorola was therefore doing the Palm hardware because it had to, while by also going for Psion/Symbian it was going to give Psion far greater credibility in the States.

Well, so much for that one. By knifing the Psion project Motorola is voting for Palm (although it still allegedly has other Symbian projects planned for 2002), and Psion is back to the drawing board.

There's still a slew of Symbian kit in the works, and in all probability its purveyors - the Nokias, Intels and DoCoMos of this world) won't be entirely distressed by the discomfiture of Psion and Motorola. Far better, surely, to have the US phone titan out of the picture, and Psion weakened, leaving the jam for the rest of us. But round at Psion's it's obviously time for the bright idea for the next big gamble. ®

Related stories:
Nokia unveils first Symbian Crystal Communicator
Nokia, Psion, Intel demo next gen Symbian Quartz kit
Motorola takes wraps off 'Odin' Symbian PDA

Remote control for virtualized desktops

More from The Register

next story
Azure TITSUP caused by INFINITE LOOP
Fat fingered geo-block kept Aussies in the dark
NASA launches new climate model at SC14
75 days of supercomputing later ...
Yahoo! blames! MONSTER! email! OUTAGE! on! CUT! CABLE! bungle!
Weekend woe for BT as telco struggles to restore service
You think the CLOUD's insecure? It's BETTER than UK.GOV's DATA CENTRES
We don't even know where some of them ARE – Maude
DEATH by COMMENTS: WordPress XSS vuln is BIGGEST for YEARS
Trio of XSS turns attackers into admins
Cloud unicorns are extinct so DiData cloud mess was YOUR fault
Applications need to be built to handle TITSUP incidents
BOFH: WHERE did this 'fax-enabled' printer UPGRADE come from?
Don't worry about that cable, it's part of the config
Stop the IoT revolution! We need to figure out packet sizes first
Researchers test 802.15.4 and find we know nuh-think! about large scale sensor network ops
prev story

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
10 threats to successful enterprise endpoint backup
10 threats to a successful backup including issues with BYOD, slow backups and ineffective security.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.