Windows Roundup Wide public beta for Whistler?

Plus: WinME, hero or villain?

It's been over a hundred days since Windows ME was released, and PCWorld has a write-up of what it's been like for Microsoft and Windows ME itself.

This article makes it clear that even though Microsoft considers it a complete upgrade over Windows 98, it's either the best Windows version ever or the worst. Microsoft kept the launch of Windows ME low key, and one of its big problems was incompatibility with drivers and applications that were fully compatible in Windows 98. What has Microsoft done to resolve this? Nothing! ME may be great for gaming, but it's well below average for daily use.

In any case, Microsoft wants to win over the users who stayed with Windows 98 and did not upgrade. Which is why it's introducing Windows Whistler (or Windows 2001/2, as it may be known). In the same article, PCWorld tackles the topic of how Microsoft doesn't want you to upgrade to Whistler if you're currently running Windows 95. Why? Your hardware doesn't come up to its hefty standards. Yes, it will probably be Microsoft's most acclaimed product for both consumer and business use, but didn't they say that about every other Windows product?



If Bill Clinton became president, why can't Bill Gates? In a

recent editorial

at ZDNet, Lee Schlesinger propses that even though Americans are ready to elect any leader who claims, "I did not have sexual relationship with..." why can't Bill Gates become president?



He'll have the support of all the computer geeks, which make up, oh... a whole two per cent of the US' population. But he's proven he can lead a company into a monopoly in 25 years! Which means he knows all of the hard facts about the government, along with already having lots of connections inside of the gruesome democracy. OK, so he won't become president anytime soon, but it's a good read!



Window Planet

reports that Microsoft may begin releasing some of the Whistler betas to the public, in a matter similar to that used with the Windows 98 - aka Memphis - beta project. Early reports show that you'll have to pay for the privilege of testing the software, although this has yet to be confirmed. Going by estimates, Microsoft should begin releasing public betas in around two months, given that a restricted beta 2 is only going to be released next month. ®



More Windows Woundups can be viewed here

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