Feeds

Hacker fighting club launched by IT bigwigs

MS, Oracle, Intel et al share security secrets

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup

Some of the biggest names in the US high tech sector have put aside their differences to launch a cyber-crime fighting club.

Nineteen companies, including Microsoft, Oracle and Intel, have formed the Information Technology Information Sharing and Analysis Centre (IT-ISAC). The idea is that members will share security secrets on hacking threats, as well as reveal weaknesses in their company software and hardware. They will also swap information with the government.

Members have contributed a total of $750,000 to start the non-profit centre, run by Atlanta-based Internet Security Systems. It will offer 24/7 advice to members, alerting them to potential hack attacks and vulnerabilities.

Latecomers will have to cough up $5,000 per year to join the organisation.

Speaking today in Washington, Commerce Secretary Norman Mineta, said: "We cannot sit idly by and let this [e-commerce] be a target for hackers."

Mineta, no doubt warming up to his upcoming role as Transportation Secretary in the Bush administration, said the move was: "Sending a strong signal to would-be attackers that we are not going to let them get away with cyber-terrorism. We stand united."

While a good idea in theory, it will be interesting to see if the group works. Despite its title - dubbed "a terrible name" by Richard Clarke, national coordinator for security, infrastructure protection and counter-terrorism - the group faces another major hurdle. Can bitter foes such as Microsoft and Oracle really be trusted to put aside their wrangles and share secrets about weaknesses in their company systems?

It is not long since Oracle admitted rummaging in Microsoft's garbage for confidential tit-bits.

But in the days of cyber-terrorism that's all in the past. There wasn't a dry eye in the house as Mary-Ann Davidson, Oracle security product manager, launched into here speech today: "No man is an island. And nowhere is this more apparent than in protecting the nation's infrastructure."

"Every one of us has been or will be attacked in cyberspace," she said. "A threat against one is truly a threat against all." ®

Related Stories

Catch a hacker, win a book
Feds find pro-Napster hacker
Boots hacked
Windows is most-hacked Webserver
Egghead doubts hackers got the goods
Ellison offers Gates all his rubbish

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
Assange™: Hey world, I'M STILL HERE, ignore that Snowden guy
Press conference: ME ME ME ME ME ME ME (cont'd pg 94)
Premier League wants to PURGE ALL FOOTIE GIFs from social media
Not paying Murdoch? You're gonna get a right LEGALLING - thanks to automated software
Caught red-handed: UK cops, PCSOs, specials behaving badly… on social media
No Mr Fuzz, don't ask a crime victim to be your pal on Facebook
Ballmer quits Microsoft board to spend more time with his b-balls
From Clippy to Clippers: Hi, I see you're running an NBA team now ...
Online tat bazaar eBay coughs to YET ANOTHER outage
Web-based flea market struck dumb by size and scale of fail
Kate Bush: Don't make me HAVE CONTACT with your iPHONE
Can't face sea of wobbling fondle implements. What happened to lighters, eh?
Amazon takes swipe at PayPal, Square with card reader for mobes
Etailer plans to undercut rivals with low transaction fee offer
Call of Duty daddy considers launching own movie studio
Activision Blizzard might like quality control of a CoD film
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.