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Celeron gets ‘go faster’ stripes

800MHz version with 100MHz bus

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Intel has finally freed its budget Celeron processor from the 66MHz system bus it has been lumbered with, and has announced the release of an 800MHz version, with a more grown up 100MHz system bus.

Intel also announced an associated new chipset, the 810E2, with ATA/100 support and new USB controllers to support four "plug and play" ports.

The processors are available at $170, in 1000's. Our own Mike Magee had a peek at a Celeron roadmap late last year, which you can find here with price and lifespan info on the other Celeron processors.

The news comes only three months (to the day) after we first reported it, so well done to Intel for keeping on top of things.

In the same breath Chipzilla announced a cheaper, if slightly hobbled, version of the P4. It will run at 1.3GHz rather than 1.4GHz - a move designed to boost demand for the chip. This will sell, in lots of 1000, for $409, compared to the rather pricier 1.4GHz version which, according to the "Sharky Extreme price guide, would set you back nearly $600 OEM, or $750 at retail. ®

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