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1GHz PIII notebook uses desktop chip

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Updated Two swallows don't make a spring [shouldn't that be summer? Ed], the old English saw goes, but it seems that Intel is pulling out all of the stops to make its 1GHz Pentium IIIs arrive before frogs even spawn in British ponds.

An advert on German television earlier this evening from Media Markt announced a notebook for DM 4,999 which includes a Pentium III 1GHz chip.

The mobile version of this chip, according to Intel's own WW51 roadmap, is not supposed to arrive until March, but it's now pretty clear that Gericom (see this page and Media Markt haven't jumped the gun.

Earlier on today, Dell was advertising the 1.3GHz Pentium 4 processor, which is not supposed to be launched until the 29th of January.

It now appears that Austrian company Gericom is sticking Pentium IIIs in FC-PGA packaging into a notebook case.

This may not be an ideal solution if you want a battery to last longer than a few minutes, but it will certainly keep you warm in winter.

The complete spec is at this page.

When we were in Taiwan last September, we did hear that the FC-PGA Pentium III was running so cool that some OEMs were just slotting the chip into notebook mobos.

And we cannot see any mention of SpeedStep in the German ad... ®

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