Feeds

AT&T wireless starts move to 3G convergence with GSM

Nokia, Ericsson, GPRS - the beginning of a love-in?

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

US cellular giant AT&T has recruited Nokia and Ericsson to speed up its transition to 3G network systems. The two companies have signed letters of intent with AT&T, and will be delivering equipment that supports both the GPRS mobile packet data system currently being deployed in Europe, and the higher speed EDGE (Enhanced Data Rates for Global Evolution) system.

The route AT&T has chosen is largely in line with the roadmap being put forward by the Universal Wireless Communications Consortium (UWCC), of which AT&T is a member. The UWCC is the umbrella body for companies using the TDMA wireless standard; this is in many respects a near relation of Europe's GSM, and the UWCC sees EDGE as facilitating data convergence between GSM and TDMA.

The use of GPRS by AT&T is however what you might call a development. In Europe the 3G roadmap rolls out GPRS first for mobile data, with EDGE being envisaged as a kind of halfway house to full 3G UMTS. Because of the time it will take to roll out the latter networks, there will be considerable overlap between systems, and at least in the early years actual performance of what you might call 2.5G networks is likely to exceed performance of the embryonic 3G ones.

In the US however full 3G is further off, while EDGE has been groomed much more as a 3G technology, and US companies have been expected to move straight to EDGE without bothering about GPRS. AT&T's move therefore suggests a possible outbreak of sweetness and light between GSM and TDMA.

Nokia will be delivering GPRS-ready triple mode GSM/EDGE/UMTS base stations and a 1900MHz EDGE radio system, together with a test rig for use on the AT&T Wireless campus in, er, Redmond. Ericsson will be doing similar, and will be supplying AT&T with the triple band GPRS/Bluetooth R520 handset. The first phase of the network is to be deployed in the first half of next year. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Ellison: Sparc M7 is Oracle's most important silicon EVER
'Acceleration engines' key to performance, security, Larry says
Linux? Bah! Red Hat has its eye on the CLOUD – and it wants to own it
CEO says it will be 'undisputed leader' in enterprise cloud tech
Oracle SHELLSHOCKER - data titan lists unpatchables
Database kingpin lists 32 products that can't be patched (yet) as GNU fixes second vuln
Ello? ello? ello?: Facebook challenger in DDoS KNOCKOUT
Gets back up again after half an hour though
Hey, what's a STORAGE company doing working on Internet-of-Cars?
Boo - it's not a terabyte car, it's just predictive maintenance and that
prev story

Whitepapers

A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.