Feeds

AT&T wireless starts move to 3G convergence with GSM

Nokia, Ericsson, GPRS - the beginning of a love-in?

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Mobile application security vulnerability report

US cellular giant AT&T has recruited Nokia and Ericsson to speed up its transition to 3G network systems. The two companies have signed letters of intent with AT&T, and will be delivering equipment that supports both the GPRS mobile packet data system currently being deployed in Europe, and the higher speed EDGE (Enhanced Data Rates for Global Evolution) system.

The route AT&T has chosen is largely in line with the roadmap being put forward by the Universal Wireless Communications Consortium (UWCC), of which AT&T is a member. The UWCC is the umbrella body for companies using the TDMA wireless standard; this is in many respects a near relation of Europe's GSM, and the UWCC sees EDGE as facilitating data convergence between GSM and TDMA.

The use of GPRS by AT&T is however what you might call a development. In Europe the 3G roadmap rolls out GPRS first for mobile data, with EDGE being envisaged as a kind of halfway house to full 3G UMTS. Because of the time it will take to roll out the latter networks, there will be considerable overlap between systems, and at least in the early years actual performance of what you might call 2.5G networks is likely to exceed performance of the embryonic 3G ones.

In the US however full 3G is further off, while EDGE has been groomed much more as a 3G technology, and US companies have been expected to move straight to EDGE without bothering about GPRS. AT&T's move therefore suggests a possible outbreak of sweetness and light between GSM and TDMA.

Nokia will be delivering GPRS-ready triple mode GSM/EDGE/UMTS base stations and a 1900MHz EDGE radio system, together with a test rig for use on the AT&T Wireless campus in, er, Redmond. Ericsson will be doing similar, and will be supplying AT&T with the triple band GPRS/Bluetooth R520 handset. The first phase of the network is to be deployed in the first half of next year. ®

Bridging the IT gap between rising business demands and ageing tools

More from The Register

next story
Manic malware Mayhem spreads through Linux, FreeBSD web servers
And how Google could cripple infection rate in a second
EU's top data cops to meet Google, Microsoft et al over 'right to be forgotten'
Plan to hammer out 'coherent' guidelines. Good luck chaps!
US judge: YES, cops or feds so can slurp an ENTIRE Gmail account
Crooks don't have folders labelled 'drug records', opines NY beak
FLAPE – the next BIG THING in storage
Find cold data with flash, transmit it from tape
Seagate chances ARM with NAS boxes for the SOHO crowd
There's an Atom-powered offering, too
Gartner: To the right, to the right – biz sync firms who've won in a box to the right...
Magic quadrant: Top marks for, er, completeness of vision, EMC
prev story

Whitepapers

Reducing security risks from open source software
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Application security programs and practises
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.