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Rambus goes into networking hardware

First products early next year

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As the exclusivity of its future at Intel is brought into question, Rambus has announced its intentions to move into networking hardware and expand its presence in consumer electronics.

The company said that over the next two years it only expects half of its revenue to come from the PC market. The remaining half would be split about 40:60 between consumer applications and licensing fees from networking hardware.

Currently Rambus has licensing deals with NEC, Samsung and most famously with Intel for the P4. However, Intel recently indicated that it would also support competing memory technologies, and Rambus has obviously felt the need to diversify. After all, outside the PC market, its only significant deal has been with Sony for the PlayStation 2.

Rambus' marketing guru, Avo Kanadjian, said that the PC market was still the most important area to the company, but underlined its new commitment to networking hardware.

So far, in the networking hardware arena, several vendors, including PMC-Sierra and Vitesse Semiconductor, are designing RDRAM chips into their products. The first samples are expected soon, and first products are apparently slated for Q1 2001. ®

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