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Micron to pump $287m into new Singapore plant

CEO gets to ring opening bell at NYSE

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US chipmaker Micron Technology is to pump around $287 million into a flash new plant in Singapore.

The 400,000sq ft facility will be for package assembly and testing, as well as module assembly. The company expects it to be up and running early in 2002.

This will be Micron's second plant in Singapore - it already has a factory there that currently makes half its chips and has 3000 staff, around a sixth of Micron's total workforce. The Idaho-based manufacturer also has plants in the US, Italy, Japan and the UK.

The new plant is expected to hire between 500 and 1000 staff. The company, which today saw its ten-year anniversary on the New York Stock Exchange, said it chose the Singapore location due to the success of its other plant there.

Micron CEO and chairman Steve Appleton rang the opening bell for the NYSE this morning to celebrate the anniversary.

Hitachi and chip subcontractor TSMC also have facilities in Singapore. ®

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