Feeds

MP3 players go little and large

Gizmothon: Convergence Trinkets'r'Us

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

Comdex Is there no beginning to this convergence innovation? LG Electronics again showed its small, dinky MP3 player with a built-in camera, called the Digital Music Eye, that looked tiny and stylish. However with 32Mb of storage it's more of a camera than an audio player.

The MP3 player market seems to be polarising pretty rapidly. On the one hand are the ultra light solid state devices, which don't hold much music, but are getting lighter by the week. At the other end, hard-disk based players give you the possibility of carrying a large chunk of your music collection around with you at once.

The heavy just got heavier. While Creative Labs used Comdex to promote its 6Gb-capacity MP3 player, Korean manufacturer CMC is showing a 20Gb player that also plays CD-RW media. As you'd expect, it looks like a CD Walkman with a pituitary gland disorder: it ain't small. CMC says it includes an MP3 encoder, allowing audio input to be converted and stored on the device, and a remote control. It's slated to ship next May for around $499. Take your chances here for more information.

If low weight and discreet were all that mattered, then Sony would have the market tied up. It showed a memory stick version of its pen sized "Network" NW-S4 player at its booth. The NW-MS9 has a 64MB stick bundled, and since a 128MB version of the stick should be ready next spring, that should give it the edge over rivals. Both are ridiculously discreet.

The player itself should ship in January or February, and plays the open MP3 and proprietary Microsoft and Liquid Audio formats. The 64Mb NW-S4 weighs 2.5oz and is water resistant. We'll stick with quoting storage capacity here rather than estimated playing time, as manufacturers' figures work on the assumption that it's encoded at 96, although we can't imagine anyone ripping at less than 160. Alas Sony is standing by the SDMI format, through which all transfers must be made.

So the choice is clear. Do you want a player slightly heavier than your Discman, which holds dozens of your CDs, or a do you want a slightly cheaper player that holds about an hour's worth of music, but that could elude detection at a cavity search at customs. Hmm... tough one, that. ®

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

More from The Register

next story
Scrapping the Human Rights Act: What about privacy and freedom of expression?
Justice minister's attack to destroy ability to challenge state
WHY did Sunday Mirror stoop to slurping selfies for smut sting?
Tabloid splashes, MP resigns - but there's a BIG copyright issue here
Google hits back at 'Dear Rupert' over search dominance claims
Choc Factory sniffs: 'We're not pirate-lovers - also, you publish The Sun'
EU to accuse Ireland of giving Apple an overly peachy tax deal – report
Probe expected to say single-digit rate was unlawful
Inequality increasing? BOLLOCKS! You heard me: 'Screw the 1%'
There's morality and then there's economics ...
While you queued for an iPhone 6, Apple's Cook sold shares worth $35m
Right before the stock took a 3.8% dive amid bent and broken mobe drama
4chan outraged by Emma Watson nudie photo leak SCAM
In the immortal words of Shaggy, it wasn't me us ... amirite?
prev story

Whitepapers

A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.