Feeds

Palm erodes Handspring marketshare

Continues to retake consumer PDA market

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

Palm continued to eat into the marketshare of PalmOS-licensee Handspring during September thanks to its increased focus on the mainstream consumer market.

According to US retail and mail order market watcher NPD Intelect, Palm had a 68.8 per cent share of PDA sales in that arena during September, down a smidge on August's figure of 70 per cent.

Palm dominated the PDA market, followed by Handspring with 11.2 per cent, down on the 15.5 per cent it took in August. Handspring was founded by the two people - Jeff Hawkins and Donna Dubinsky - who first set up Palm.

It's important to note that NPD's figures are based on dollar sales, so Palm's slight slip can, in part, be attributed to a shift towards its m100 consumer PDA with its low price. Handspring lacks the higher priced models that Palm offers, so its dollar share will inevitably appear lower than its unit share.

Still, Handspring's drop does suggest that sales are slowing a little, probably in response to Palm's move on its territory and because its product line could do with updating.

In any case, Handspring remains way above number three in the market, NEC, at 4.6 per cent, arriving from nowhere and knocking Casio out of the top five. Compaq came in at number four, also with 4.6 per cent, and Hewlett-Packard was fifth, with 4.3 per cent.

All this leaves Windows CE with a higher share of the market than it had in August, but again, high PocketPC prices push up these three companies' share even though they may not have sold that many more machines.

One final note, NPD's figures for the period January to September show that some two million PDAs were sold through retail during those months this year, an increase of nearly 163 per cent on the 800,000 PDAs sold during the same nine-month period in 1999. The average price of a PDA fell 13.3 per cent between those two periods, from $345 to $299.

By contrast, the number of desktop PCs sold during that timeframe fell from nine million units in 1999 to 7.6 million units this year, a drop of 16.2 per cent. The average price rose nearly four per cent from $951 to $987. ®

Rank Brand Dollar Share
(Per Cent)
1 Palm 68.8%
2 Handspring 11.2%
3 NEC 4.6%
4 Compaq 4.6%
5 Hewlett-Packard 4.3%

Related Story

Palm retakes ground grabbed by Handspring

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
Facebook pays INFINITELY MORE UK corp tax than in 2012
Thanks for the £3k, Zuck. Doh! you're IN CREDIT. Guess not
DOUBLE BONK: Testy fanbois catch Apple Pay picking pockets
Users wail as tapcash transactions are duplicated
Happiness economics is bollocks. Oh, UK.gov just adopted it? Er ...
Opportunity doesn't knock; it costs us instead
Google Glassholes are UNDATEABLE – HP exec
You need an emotional connection, says touchy-feely MD... We can do that
YARR! Pirates walk the plank: DMCA magnets sink in Google results
Spaffing copyrighted stuff over the web? No search ranking for you
prev story

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
New hybrid storage solutions
Tackling data challenges through emerging hybrid storage solutions that enable optimum database performance whilst managing costs and increasingly large data stores.