Feeds

BT makes concessions on LLU

Yeah right, no more foot-dragging please, you're making the carpet threadbare

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction

BT has published a new plan to aid what it calls the "rapid progress in local loop unbundling" (LLU).

The idea was made public this morning at an Oftel meeting of UK telcos.

It plans to introduce an interim order process and provisioning system ahead of the planned full strategic operational support system. This system, claims BT, should help lines become unbundled sooner.

And in what might turn out to be the significant development, BT has also suggested that other telcos use nearby buildings to increase the amount of space available at exchanges.

"Using nearby buildings can potentially enable every operator that wants it to have access to the lines in any given exchange area," said BT in a statement.

"With some BT exchange buildings having insufficient space to pack in the numbers of operators who have expressed interest, using adjacent buildings is one of the most effective paths to greater availability of LLU."

If this is true, then the problems of allocating limited space in exchanges should be eased. The downside of this is that telcos won't have to thow a die to decide who gets in where.

Of course, with BT nothing is ever straightforward and as always, the industry will be watching the detail of today's announcement with great interest. Few people will be prepared to stick their necks out until they have time to asses what BT is really saying - and what it means.

The company may have announced major structural and cultural changes yesterday - but things don't happen that fast - and certainly not in BT.

People will remain sceptical - and rightly so - about BT and its plans. No doubt the threat of legal action from telcos had absolutely nothing to do with today's change of heart. ®

Related Stories

Europe votes in favour of LLU
Energis leads fight against BT
UK telcos in game of chance
BT's profits plummet

3 Big data security analytics techniques

More from The Register

next story
This time it's 'Personal': new Office 365 sub covers just two devices
Redmond also brings Office into Google's back yard
Kingston DataTraveler MicroDuo: Turn your phone into a 72GB beast
USB-usiness in the front, micro-USB party in the back
Dropbox defends fantastically badly timed Condoleezza Rice appointment
'Nothing is going to change with Dr. Rice's appointment,' file sharer promises
BOFH: Oh DO tell us what you think. *CLICK*
$%%&amp Oh dear, we've been cut *CLICK* Well hello *CLICK* You're breaking up...
AMD's 'Seattle' 64-bit ARM server chips now sampling, set to launch in late 2014
But they won't appear in SeaMicro Fabric Compute Systems anytime soon
Cisco reps flog Whiptail's Invicta arrays against EMC and Pure
Storage reseller report reveals who's selling what
prev story

Whitepapers

SANS - Survey on application security programs
In this whitepaper learn about the state of application security programs and practices of 488 surveyed respondents, and discover how mature and effective these programs are.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.