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Taiwan DRAM gang ditches Rambus

Three vendors team up to announce and end to RDRAM production

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A trio of Taiwanese memory manufacturers have dumped Rambus production, Taiwan newspaper the Commercial Times has reported.

Winbond Electronics, Promos Technologies and Powerchip Semiconductor all cited their doubts over the future of the Direct DRAM market as the main motivation for their decision to end production.

Winbond said that production would be "indefinitely postponed" because demand from RDRAM parts was drying up. It noted that Toshiba and Sony were requiring less and less RDRAM.

Sony uses the memory technology in its PlayStation 2 console. The trouble is, while it can get all the RDRAM it needs, it doesn't need too much because shortages of other components are limiting production.

The DRAM makers also said their decision to abandon RDRAM production was influenced by growing demand for double data rate (DDR) SDRAM. They expect that technology to dominate the market in the near future - as, presumably, does Rambus itself, which is why it's so vigorously pursuing its DDR SDRAM patent licensing revenue stream. ®

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