UK Web site to lift lid on ‘police corruption’

It's a (un)fair cop, gov

A Web site allegedly operated by "serving and retired Surrey Police officers" is set to blow the whistle on police corruption.

The site is due to go live on Sunday and claims to be written and produced by serving officers who have themselves been the "victims of police corruption".

It claims it will details the "conduct of certain senior police officers".

Those behind the site claim they are merely "expressing [their] rights under Article 10 of the Human Rights Act 1998".

Article 10 relates to freedom of speech.

Those running surreypolice.com have already received a letter from the Surrey Police Force, based in Guildford, threatening "injunctive relief".

This, though, is for cybersquatting.

Although the name of the sender has been blanked out, the letter says: "It is my view that if your use of the [surreypolice.com] domain name amounts to passing off. Due to the content of the site, it is clear there can be no reason for the use of this domain name other than to damage the goodwill of this organisation."

However, the deadline for those running the site to "cease using the above domain name" passed last Friday. The site is still up and running although at the time of writing there were no allegations of police corruption posted on the site.

A holding page on the site reads: "This is NOT an 'official' UK police web site.

"The domain is funded, written and managed by serving and retired Surrey Police officers who have themselves been victims of police corruption and who want to see changes made.

"Many of us have tried in vain to encourage people in positions of authority to address the serious concerns we have raised about the conduct of certain senior police officers.

"The overall majority of our colleagues on uniform police patrol share our fervency and zeal to remain loyal to the principle for which we became police officers; honesty, truth & justice.

"We will undoubtedly be brandished by senior police officers and Government Ministers as disgruntled and disloyal individuals. This is not the case."

A spokeswoman for Surrey Police confirmed that the letter on the site was genuine but refused to comment further.

It's understood officials have been in meetings all afternoon discussing the matter.

Surrey Police failed to comment on the site despite numerous attempts by The Register</> to contact the force. ®

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