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Skimpily clad waifs pranced down the catwalk at today's Fall Internet World sporting some bizarre wireless technology outfits.

Hi-tech badges, watches and glasses were all on show at the New York event, complemented by silver bikinis and space-age metallic ensembles. There was also a batch of shiny prototype Net-enabled jewellery, including a ring, necklace and earring, aimed at "marrying wireless technology with style".

Even better were prototypes such as the Charmed AromaBadge - a badge that emits smells based on the temperature, heart rate, and the "state of excitement or arousal" of the user. Or the Charmed PheroMate - which apparently helps wearers find their perfect partner through smell - or by matching pheromones.

In all, around 48 products were on show, with 28 available today ranging from $300 to $10,000.

The fashion show was organized by Charmed Technology, a Los Angeles outfit started by Slovakian model and former secret agent Katrina Barillova.

Charmed also launched its CharmIT product - a wearable computer for $2,000. Available in the US from today, it is aimed at IT hobbyists - a consumer version is planned for next year.

The product is approximately the size of two Walkmans, with an Intel 266Mhz chip, 6GHz hard drive and 64Mb memory. With 15-hour battery life, the idea is that users will carry this box storing all their data with them, and plug it into any monitor or keyboard.

According to co-founder Alex Lightman, the company is also working on a smelly gadget for release in the UK next year. The ScentBadge will be loaded up with the user's favourite perfume, which it will then spurt out every 10-15 minutes. This device is being developed by the company's lab in London, and is aimed for a Q1 launch costing around £20. It will be released in the rest of Europe, Japan and the US at a later date. ®

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