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Infineon defines ‘very fast’ data transfer speed

IEEE to standardise on 'like sh*t off a shovel', apparently...

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And this week's Scientific Precision Award goes to our chums at former Siemens subsidiary, Infineon, who today unveiled their "very fast" infra-red connectivity system.

After years of wondering how fast "very fast" was, we now, thanks to Infineon, know it to be 16Mb per second. At least that's the speed of the company's Very Fast Infra Red system, launched at the World PC Expo in Japan this morning.

Fortunately, the German chip company wasn't scooped by some clever dick's 'extremely fast' IR product, and thus was able to win the day on the speed stakes.

We are expecting future Infineon comms products to meet ever higher, ever more precise data throughputs such as 'hot cakes', 'stink', 'sh*t off a shovel' and 'f**kin' fast' in the near future, and clear matters for other velocity-challenged Reg hacks.

And the advantage of "very fast" speeds? Why, according to Infineon optoelectronics VP Mike Bottini, you can "imagine being able to transfer a 10MB video file from your PDA to a friend in less than ten seconds".

And indeed, if Infineon maintains its "very fast"-paced development schedule we might one day have a PDA capable of storing 10MB of video data. We don't have one yet, though... ®

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