Flame of the Week 2 Middle East and Reg don't mix

That Intel Israeli fab - our readers write

[Andrew's made his own contribution to the coverage on the Middle East crisis. He wrote: "It must be something of a worry to Intel, then, to be reminded that Fab 18 at Qiryat Gat is built on the site of the Palestinian village of Al Faluja. Al Faluja was destroyed in 1949 during the Israeli occupation of Palestine."

Our readers responded. All emails are published in full and unedited. The reader who sent a selection of JPEGs depicting assorted murders should seek psychiatric help immediately.

For readers wondering what all the fuss is about, check the original story Middle East unrest could threaten P4.]



As a regular reader

of your service, I do enjoy the frequent positive articles on AMD (I am an AMD shareholder). However, in your Intel article today, written my Andrew Thomas, it is stated: "It must be something of a worry to Intel, then, to be reminded that Fab 18 at Qiryat Gat is built on the site of the Palestinian village of Al Faluja. Al Faluja was destroyed in 1949 during the Israeli occupation of Palestine."



This is a lie of the worst kind and should be immediately edited out of the story.

Is it the position of your service that all of Israel is 'occupation of Palestine'? The boundaries established in 1949 after the Arabs rejected the UN partition of 1948 are the international boundaries recognised by the United Nations and specifically recognised by treaty between Israel, Egypt and Jordan. The wording of this article puts your position on this matter right along with the terrorist group Hamas, which claims that all of Israel is merely the 'Israeli occupation of Palestine'. This position is even rejected by Chairman Arafat!

Assuming you correct this unfortunate paragraph immediately and issue an apology, I will accept that it is merely mistaken wording. Thank you for your prompt attention to this matter.

Steve Goldstone



Hello,

I was shocked to read your article "Middle East unrest could threaten P4" by Andrew Thomas. Not only is Mr. Thomas distorting and omitting crucial historical facts, he is also including a link to a typical Palestinian anti-Israeli site, in the BODY of the article, and does not include any Israeli or neutral link.



Mr Thomas says the Al Faluja was destroyed in 1949 during the Israeli occupation of Palestine. This is a fundamental distortion of the facts: Israel did not occupy Palestine. It was content with the territories allotted to it in the 1947 UN resolution that divided British-controlled Palestine into a Jewish and an Arab state. It was the Arabs who refused to accept the resolution and attacked newborn Israel on the day it proclaimed statehood (May _48).

The fact that the Arabs lost on the war they started does not make them the victims, and they can only blame themselves for territories lost due to their aggression.

Anyway, have you become a political publication instead of a high-quality technology publication? And at least try to be impartial and stick to the facts if you do decide to transform into another BBC-style news site.
I hope that you will publish a correction to the bullshit Mr. Thomas has published.

Regards, Y. Cohen



Dear Mr Thomas,

I was dismayed by your recent piece regarding Intel P4 manufacturing and the recent events in the Middle East. Your brief article stated that "Al Faluja was destroyed in 1949 during the Israeli occupation of Palestine" I'm left wondering to myself what occupation it is that to which you are referring? Last time I checked the state of Israel was recognised and legitimised in 1948 by the UN and the world's nations, which resulted in a brutal attack by all the surrounding Arab nations in an attempt to wipe the new country out of existence.



Palestinians rejected offers for their own homeland in 1947 and joined in the brutal attack mentioned above. On 14 May 1948 the State of Israel was proclaimed according to the UN partition plan (1947). Less than 24 hours later, the regular armies of Egypt, Jordan, Syria, Lebanon and Iraq invaded the country, forcing Israel to defend the sovereignty it had regained in its ancestral homeland. In what became known as Israel's War of Independence, the newly formed, poorly equipped Israel Defense Forces (IDF) repulsed the invaders in fierce intermittent fighting, which lasted some 15 months and claimed over 6,000 Israeli lives (nearly one percent of the country's Jewish population at the time).

During the first few months of 1949, direct negotiations were conducted under UN auspices between Israel and each of the invading countries (except Iraq which has refused to negotiate with Israel to date), resulting in armistice agreements which reflected the situation at the end of the fighting.

Accordingly, the coastal plain, Galilee and the entire Negev were within Israel's sovereignty, Judea and Samaria (the West Bank) came under Jordanian rule, the Gaza Strip came under Egyptian administration, and the city of Jerusalem was divided, with Jordan controlling the eastern part, including the Old City, and Israel the western sector

Any damage to the village of Al Fajula would be as a result of those Arab attacks, and Israel's self defence. Any notion that territories wholly part of the state of Israel since her inception or the battles at her inception would ever come into any sort of dispute is sheer nonsense. The occupied territories so in the news today were annexed in 1967, a full twenty years and 2 conflicts (or I should say attempts to destroy the state of Israel) later.

Further, Al Fajula was in territory being administered (previously by the British) and then by Jordan at the time of its dissipation as a village. Jordan is a country which today enjoys a strong an apparently enduring peace with the state of Israel

Thus your article is quite infactual. Its the little facts in life so often that go unchecked which end up resulting later on in the biggest lies...

Yours Truly

R saus Mizrachi Montreal CA



Dear Andrew

Sorry to be a nag but your article about Fab 18 is completely flawed as far as the facts are concerned and I would have expected a bit more fineness from a Register reporter !



The site of Al Faluja is nowhere near to present day Kiryat-Gat. As you probably know people in the Middle East are very keen on land rights and 'WE BEEN HERE FIRST' attitude, unfortunately this is usually pointless and false in most cases (on both Jewish and Arab sides)

Another flawed fact mentioned in your article was about 'THE ISRAELI OCUPATION' of the area. Well the area where Kiryat Gat is located was declared by the united nations as a part of the new Israeli state that was established by the UN in 1948 it was not occupied it has always been a part of Israel. And there was never an Israeli occupation of Palestine ever! The land of Palestine was partitioned between the Jews (Israel) and Jordan in 1948 by the UN.

A decision that was not respected by Arab (Jordan, Egypt, Iraq and Syria) nations who promptly launched war against the newly born state of Israel.
That war (unfortunately for the Arabs) was won by Israel, but no non Jewish parts of Palestine were occupied during that war (Israeli war of independence in 1948-1949). The occupation of Arab areas happened much later in 1967 when the West Bank and Gaza were occupied by Israel in the six-day war. However Intel doesn't have any plants based anywhere near these areas (Gaza,West Bank) though I'm sure the Palestinians would not mind Intel coming over and settling there....

Check your history books before you ramble on about historical facts next time.

If you would like to see the true Geographic location of these places look here.

Kind Regards

Amix



Hmm...

I've now wasted quite a lot of time trying to figure this out. It appears the "Gaza Strip" is different than the "Gaza District". Israelis prefer the former and Palestinians the latter. Intel's Fab 18 sits 18 miles from Gaza 10 miles outside the Gaza Strip, but within the Gaza District.



So Qiryat Gat sits on occupied territory... even if it isn't "The Occupied Territory". The city Fab 18 is located in appears to have 2 variations on spelling: Qiryat Gat and Kiryat Gat. Intel's Fab 18 is referenced in articles using both spellings for the city. (Damn, but good online maps are hard to find.)
check here and here. Qiryat Gat is location #33 on the map of the Gaza District here. Location #33 is the site of the Palestinean city of Al Faluja. The Israeli city Qiryat Gat was built on the ashes of Al Faluja. Qiryat Gat is 18.6 miles ENE of Gaza in the Gaza District. You will note that this corresponds with the location of Kiryat Gat in the first url. It was occupied in the early spring of 1949, but lies outside the 1950 Armistice Line which defines the "Gaza Strip" occupied territory: here and here.

Garrett



What would you say

if Tony Blair commented Intel and AMD roadmaps, claiming that AMD sucks and RAMBUS rocks? You'd say it's at least lame.



Everyone should talk about what he's good at.

"It must be something of a worry to Intel, then, to be reminded that Fab 18 at Qiryat Gat is built on the site of the Palestinian village of Al Faluja. Al Faluja was destroyed in 1949 during the Israeli occupation of Palestine."

Would you talk about computers and not put your nose into what you don't have a clue about. Nice reference you found - Palestinian web-site. How would you feel if world attitude towards North Ireland was determined on the basis of what's written on IRA's web-site ? Dare your country occupy and depress poor Irish people. How it sounds , huh ?

It's either ignorance and stupidity or scumfull indecency. Pick what you like most. I don't expect you to become pro-Israeli, but at least be responsible enough to avoid topics, which are out of your comprehension.

Regarding Intel's Israeli fab, it's completely safe (thanks for your concern, though I'm not sure there was one other that trying to free another stupid rumour hopefully stinging Intel).

I'm an AMD fan btw.

Eli Tell



The Israeli/Palestinian conflict

will be offered as the excuse du jour [for the delayed launch of Pentium 4]. Launch date pushed to December. Recall scheduled internally the day following and publicly announced sometime after Q4 earnings release - long before Thomas Pabst ever sees one. And, yes, you can use me as an unnamed source as long as you don't refer to me as a 'geezer' when my info doesn't pan out.



Yours, Nostradameus.



Dear Mr. Thomas:

Thanks for taking the time to browse through the website. I am aware that Intel has a Plant some where close Beersheba, which was founded close to five years ago. I just looked at my sources, Benny Morris from Beersheba University & Mustaffa Murad al-Dabagh the great Palestinian Historian from Yafa/Jaffa/Yafo, & all mentions Qiryat Gat to be located nearby al-Faljua.
I am not aware of the other one which you have mentioned. I will do further research when I get home, & I will let you know of any further information. It should be noted, that part of the armistice agreement between the Israeli & the Egyptian armies (which was under siege in al-Falija), that the seiged inhabitants should be allowed to stay behind with complete protection on their lives & property.

Soon after the withdrawal of the Egyptian Army, a small massacre was perpetrate against the inhabitants which included several documented rape cases, & the details are properly stated by Benny Morris & Mushei Sharit (Israel's Foreign Minister at the time).

This massacre, plus organized ethnic cleansing result in the depopulation of close to 15,000 people in March 1949. Many of these people are living just across the border in the Gaza slums or what so called refugee camps. Also it should be noted that by May 1948, the Zionist & the Jews of Palestine owned only under 7% of its land & contributed up to 35%-40% of its total GDP.

After the war, everything the Palestinians had was predominantly looted (see Jaffa City at the website for more details). Again, thanks a million for taking the time to educate yourself & others about Palestine, Israel, & their common history.

sincerely,

Salah Mansour
webmaster@PalestineRemembered.com

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