Feeds

Middle East unrest could threaten P4

Intel chip plant built on ruins of Palestinian village

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Although the situation in the Middle East is mercifully slightly more stable today than it was last week, relations between Israel and the Palestinians are still a long way from what one might call cordial.

It must be something of a worry to Intel, then, to be reminded that Fab 18 at Qiryat Gat is built on the site of the Palestinian village of Al Faluja. Al Faluja was destroyed in 1949 during the Israeli occupation of Palestine.

Fab 18 is tasked with producing practically all the world's Pentium 4s and it would be something of a challenge, to use a good old Intel phrase, should the plant be involved in any local unpleasantness or were it to become a pawn in a territorial dispute.

Intel refused to comment on contingency plans for shifting production from Qiryat Gat should the worst happen, beyond stating:

"The safety of our employees is paramount. We continue to monitor developments in the region." ®

Related stories

Pentium 4 yields 'not impressive'
Israel to make a million 1.7GHz Pentium 4s

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
7 Elements of Radically Simple OS Migration
Avoid the typical headaches of OS migration during your next project by learning about 7 elements of radically simple OS migration.
BYOD's dark side: Data protection
An endpoint data protection solution that adds value to the user and the organization so it can protect itself from data loss as well as leverage corporate data.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?