Feeds

UK telcos in game of chance

Just like a game of Monopoly

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

High performance access to file storage

The future of competitive telecom services in Britain could be reduced to little more than a crap shoot according to official documents from the Electoral Reform Services (ERS).

Some 30 telcos have submitted their applications to install equipment in local exchanges as part of local loop unbundling (ULL).

But if the allocation of limited space cannot be decided - and there is a complex system in place to ensure that it is - then those involved will be invited to throw a die to resolve the issue.

Whichever telco throws the highest number will be the "winner".

Joe Wadsworth of the independent body, ERS - which is scrutinising the allocation process - confirmed that this game of chance would be the last resort.

He said: "I think it's unlikely to happen."

The process for allocating which telcos get to install their equipment in which local exchanges in based on a complex electoral system of the single transferable vote.

Both Mr Wadsworth and a spokeswoman for regulator, OFTEL, declined to explain exactly how it worked.

The results of which companies have succeeded in winning space in local exchanges are due in tomorrow. A second tranche of allocations is due in December.

Yesterday, Kingston Communications PLC, which is 44.9 per cent owned by Hull city council, said it had applied for access in up to 1,000 exchanges to provide broadband business and residential services to customers when the local loop in unbundled next year.

The services will be supported by Kingston's new broadband national network, which is currently being built alongside Colt Telecom.

Said Kingston CE, Steve Maine: "We are now rolling out our own national network capable of supporting these activities and hope that BT will work with us and other operators to make advanced services available within the agreed industry timescale."

It's not known if Maine prefers to use his cupped hands or a little beaker to throw dice, or whether he blows on them first before shouting, "C'mon baby, this one's for daddy". ®

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Seagate brings out 6TB HDD, did not need NO STEENKIN' SHINGLES
Or helium filling either, according to reports
European Court of Justice rips up Data Retention Directive
Rules 'interfering' measure to be 'invalid'
Dropbox defends fantastically badly timed Condoleezza Rice appointment
'Nothing is going to change with Dr. Rice's appointment,' file sharer promises
Cisco reps flog Whiptail's Invicta arrays against EMC and Pure
Storage reseller report reveals who's selling what
Bored with trading oil and gold? Why not flog some CLOUD servers?
Chicago Mercantile Exchange plans cloud spot exchange
Just what could be inside Dropbox's new 'Home For Life'?
Biz apps, messaging, photos, email, more storage – sorry, did you think there would be cake?
IT bods: How long does it take YOU to train up on new tech?
I'll leave my arrays to do the hard work, if you don't mind
Amazon reveals its Google-killing 'R3' server instances
A mega-memory instance that never forgets
prev story

Whitepapers

Mainstay ROI - Does application security pay?
In this whitepaper learn how you and your enterprise might benefit from better software security.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.