Feeds

More domain name craziness – .hm this time

The Royal family should get it

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Top three mobile application threats

Following on from Tuvalu, which has the top-level domain name ".tv", a reader has drawn our attention to the Heard and McDonald Islands - situated about 1,500 km north of Antarctica, 4,100 km south-west of Australia, and about 4,700 km south-east of Africa. These two islands have the TLD ".hm" - not quite as sexy as "tv" admittedly, but then it is being sold as a shorthand for "home". We reckon that the royal family should snap up some of the domain names quick smart.

The interesting thing here is that no one does, has and probably never will live on either island. The nearest human gathering is 4,000km away. Both are volcanic and Heard boasts its own active volcano. If you were to hang around, aside from the snow, ice and the odd seal you'd have to make do with some interesting fauna as recreation. If you're lucky, you might catch one of the totally infrequent scientific expeditions that pop down for a few days.

Which makes it incredible that you can buy a domain name representing the islands. The information certainly won't be held in servers on the island because there aren't any. And since there is no whois database for hm domains, we're unsure who exactly is running www.start.hm - the registering board (hang on shouldn't the registrar actually live on the island?). It's an Australian outfit, that's for sure.

So what if you fancy a .hm? Well, it's a little dear - they want $50 a name plus $50 every year as an annual fee. Not many people seem to have taken them up on the idea. Aside from registrar domains, we could only find one site up and running - ishop.hm - and that directs all its traffic to .com sites. Links to other sites were found but none of them seem to work.

Another odd thing - despite its utter rejection by humankind, it still has an annual budget of US$234,000 from the Australian government. Eh?

Wanna know the history? First discovered by a British sealer, Peter Kemp on 27 November 1833. In 1849 it was rediscovered by an American whaler, Thomas Long. Neither of these discoveries was published, and credit for discovery went to Captain John Heard of the American merchant vessel Oriental on 25 November 1853.

The first recorded landing was by a sealing expedition in March 1855. During the sealing period from 1855-1880, various people spent a year or more on the island collecting oil and a good percentage of them died (drowning, capsize, frostbite, scurvy, general illness). By 1880, nearly all the seals were dead, so people gave up on it. It was part of the British Empire at this time, until in 1947, the UK gave it to Australia. Which promptly forgot all about it until 1953, when the Heard and McDonald Islands Act was passed. Nothing then until an Australian helicopter landed in 1971. Another expedition went there in 1980.

And there you have it. ®

Related Story

How to make lots of money from the Internet

The Essential Guide to IT Transformation

More from The Register

next story
BBC goes offline in MASSIVE COCKUP: Stephen Fry partly muzzled
Auntie tight-lipped as major outage rolls on
Nadella: Apps must run on ALL WINDOWS – PCs, slabs and mobes
Phone egg, meet desktop chicken - your mother
ITC: Seagate and LSI can infringe Realtek patents because Realtek isn't in the US
Land of the (get off scot) free, when it's a foreign owner
HP, Microsoft prove it again: Big Business doesn't create jobs
SMEs get lip service - what they need is dinner at the Club
Samsung threatens to cut ties with supplier over child labour allegations
Vows to uphold 'zero tolerance' policy on underage workers
Dude, you're getting a Dell – with BITCOIN: IT giant slurps cryptocash
1. Buy PC with Bitcoin. 2. Mine more coins. 3. Goto step 1
There's NOTHING on TV in Europe – American video DOMINATES
Even France's mega subsidies don't stop US content onslaught
You! Pirate! Stop pirating, or we shall admonish you politely. Repeatedly, if necessary
And we shall go about telling people you smell. No, not really
US freemium mobile network eyes up Europe
FreedomPop touts 'free' calls, texts and data
prev story

Whitepapers

Seven Steps to Software Security
Seven practical steps you can begin to take today to secure your applications and prevent the damages a successful cyber-attack can cause.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.