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We all still want Bluetooth

But we'll be long in the tooth before we get it

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According to some kinda research or other, everyone is still mad for Bluetooth - despite the fact that it's beginning to look like a universal con job.

Annual shipments of Bluetooth devices by (you've guessed it) 2005 will reach 1.4 billion (for some reason, the research chooses to refer to units as nodes). Apparently next year, there'll be 56 million of them shipped. Now all they have to do is tell the manufacturers. This is very important newsworthy stuff. Just a shame then that exactly the same thing was said back in July.

However, unlike the July report - which said widespread takeup would start in 2001, now this report reckons widespread takeup will begin in 2002. Funny pattern emerging.

The author of the report (Allied Business Intelligence's Director of Residential & Networking Technologies Navin Sabharwal) reiterated the same old stuff that we have every couple of months: "Bluetooth technology's promise of a low-power and low-cost solution", "we will begin to see Bluetooth transceivers embedded in everything from PC equipment to industrial devices", you know the sort of thing.

The fact is that, yes, Bluetooth's great, wonderful, amazing, life-enhancing but where the bloody hell is it? The IT industry started getting excited about it, what, three years ago. Every time you ever go to an IT show, there's someone harping on about Bluetooth.

Well, like when you wait too long for your food at a restaurant, we're beginning to lose our appetite. We're considering foregoing the nicer meal and popping out for some fast food instead - at least it's there.

Bluetooth, Bluetooth, wherefore art thou Bluetooth? ®

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