Feeds

MS has yet another crack at handheld PCs

We think the point this time is they're not supposed to sell in stacks...

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

The essential guide to IT transformation

The operating system formerly known as Windows CE is coming round for yet another go, this time in the shape of the Handheld PC 2000 form factor. Microsoft's abject failure so far to make a serious go of the handheld/PDA market, or even to nail down a proper definition and stick to it, clearly hasn't convinced the company that it might as well just give up.

And actually, it's probably right to persist. HPC2k is essentially a retread of the "Jupiter" class of CE device Microsoft started pushing, to little visible effect, a couple of years back. the companies that went for Jupiter have thinned out considerably, with only HP, NEC and Sharp putting their hands up for HPC2k, but there are going to be markets for cheapish, robust mobile devices that can work with corporate networks, and if Microsoft keeps on plugging away, it stands a good chance of cracking them eventually.

The new devices are a little more beefed up than the previous generation, coming with thin client software and some tidying to produce more consistency with current Windows desktops. They'll also come with the latest media player, and they'll be out in a couple of weeks, priced high still, at $800-$1,000.

That however isn't necessarily a problem. In corporate and vertical markets (e.g. healthcare) Microsoft has the potential advantage of installed base. HPC2k devices, provided (a big caveat this) Microsoft has got the connectivity right, potentially have ease of integration as an advantage, and there are also factors like down-the-line MS-supporting systems managers, determined to stamp out Palm Pilots in the name of 'security,' to consider. With this in mind, a thin client capability is potentially handy, because if (another big if) you set it up right, you can stop your sensitive data walking out of the building.

And lastly, there's the phony war aspect to consider. Microsoft hasn't made it work, but neither has anybody else. There are a few small specialist outfits shifting small numbers of units, but the predicted volumes haven't happened yet. Sooner or later, though, they will. ®

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
Mozilla's 'Tiles' ads debut in new Firefox nightlies
You can try turning them off and on again
No, thank you. I will not code for the Caliphate
Some assignments, even the Bongster decline must
Barnes & Noble: Swallow a Samsung Nook tablet, please ... pretty please
Novelslab finally on sale with ($199 - $20) price tag
Banking apps: Handy, can grab all your money... and RIDDLED with coding flaws
Yep, that one place you'd hoped you wouldn't find 'em
TROLL SLAYER Google grabs $1.3 MEEELLION in patent counter-suit
Chocolate Factory hits back at firm for suing customers
Primetime precrime? Minority Report TV series 'being developed'
I have to know. I have to find out what happened to my life
Netflix swallows yet another bitter pill, inks peering deal with TWC
Net neutrality crusader once again pays up for priority access
prev story

Whitepapers

Top 10 endpoint backup mistakes
Avoid the ten endpoint backup mistakes to ensure that your critical corporate data is protected and end user productivity is improved.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up distributed data
Eliminating the redundant use of bandwidth and storage capacity and application consolidation in the modern data center.
The essential guide to IT transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIOs automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.