Feeds

Dr Drew raises spectre of paid-for content

It'll never work people say (but we wish it would)

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Security for virtualized datacentres

Sex and health site Dr Drew has announced the results of its own survey that says users will happily pay for personalised content. Of the 15,000 people that responded, 74 per cent said they would like a personal service and 56 per cent said they would pay for it.

Dr Drew's CEO, Curtis Giesen, claimed folk wanted an anonymous and individual service and would be willing to cough up for just that. However, a whole swathe of analysts have poured cold water on the idea, saying that people will not pay for the information when they can get it for free elsewhere. It would have to offer something pretty unique and Dr Drew's content is not all that different to anybody else's, said one.

It's the old argument reborn - people happily pay a premium in most industries if they feel they are getting a better service. But then overriding the Internet's culture of everything-for-free will not be an easy job. The early dreams of charging for content dissolved fairly quickly, forcing Web companies to find new ways of getting hold of some cash - selling visitor information and going for an IPO are two of the most popular.

But are we rapidly reaching a point where enough people are online and where the sheer quantity of information available makes premium charged-for products a possibility? Perhaps. And healthcare is certainly one area where people are very interested in a closely defined area of information. If a relative has a particular medical concern, it's not inconceivable that you would pay for automatically sent information on that condition.

However, it would take a brave company to write such a personalisation scheme into its business plan. We're not too sure that Dr Drew is the best example either. That is unless you were dying to find out "why guys fart so much" or wanted to know the soul-searching a model had to go through when considering plastic surgery. ®

Disclaimer We would like to point out that Dr Drew has no connection whatsoever with Reg head honcho Drew Cullen. While Dr Drew is a doctor, Mr Cullen is a Bachelor (of Arts). Any accusations that he is a "witch" or "head" doctor will be dealt with at the usual Thursday-night voodoo ceremony.

Our own Doctor Spinola and his wise words can be found (among other things) here.

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

More from The Register

next story
Ex-US Navy fighter pilot MIT prof: Drones beat humans - I should know
'Missy' Cummings on UAVs, smartcars and dying from boredom
Facebook, Apple: LADIES! Why not FREEZE your EGGS? It's on the company!
No biological clockwatching when you work in Silicon Valley
The 'fun-nification' of computer education – good idea?
Compulsory code schools, luvvies love it, but what about Maths and Physics?
Doctor Who's Flatline: Cool monsters, yes, but utterly limp subplots
We know what the Doctor does, stop going on about it already
'Cowardly, venomous trolls' threatened with TWO-YEAR sentences for menacing posts
UK government: 'Taking a stand against a baying cyber-mob'
Happiness economics is bollocks. Oh, UK.gov just adopted it? Er ...
Opportunity doesn't knock; it costs us instead
Sysadmin with EBOLA? Gartner's issued advice to debug your biz
Start hoarding cleaning supplies, analyst firm says, and assume your team will scatter
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.