Feeds

BBC drugs site stoned by reactionists

It's witch-hunt week here in the UK

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

High performance access to file storage

Tired of trying to get innocent people lynched by crazed paedophile-hunting gangs, The Daily Mail has turned on the BBC with a front-page rant at its Radio 1 Web site.

In its Essentials section on the site, Radio 1 has made the mistake of providing balanced information on illegal drugs. The justifying opening paragraph on the site was seized upon as an example of just how immoral the BBC has become: "It's summertime and for most of us that means sun, sea, sex, dancing and parties. Summer parties will inevitably bring you into contact with drugs. This section is a guide to the drugs you might come into contact with - it's important that you know what you're getting into, and that every decision you make is informed."

We had a trawl through the site and were actually fairly impressed with the balance achieved. A large array of links are given and the emphasis is on education rather than repeating hysterical claims or conversely giving drugs and air of excitement and mystery.

This may be good for rational human beings and also for the teenagers themselves, but it is too much to take for the Mail and its array of like-minded "experts". Why educate when we can pretend the situation doesn't exist? Plus everyone knows in their heart of hearts that even talking about drugs makes everyone go out and take them and subsequently die.

So up pops Robert Whelan of Family and Youth Concern - the BBC is encouraging illegal activity. Here comes Paul Betts, self-appointed conscience of the nation after his daughter died from drinking too much water after taking an ecstasy pill. Mr Betts informs us that the BBC's claim that young people will inevitably come into contact with drugs is wrong. We can inform him that he is wrong.

We think the Mail is terrific. We value its views on this "permissive propaganda". Mostly because it reminds us that you can't take reasoning and commonsense for granted. ®

Related Link

The BBC drugs site

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Forget the beach 'n' boardwalk, check out the Santa Cruz STEVE JOBS FOUNTAIN
Reg reader snaps shot of touching tribute to Apple icon
Spanish village called 'Kill the Jews' mulls rebranding exercise
Not exactly attractive to the Israeli tourist demographic
Oz bank in comedy Heartbleed blog FAIL
Bank: 'We are now safely patched.' Customers: 'You were using OpenSSL?'
Happy 40th Playmobil: Reg looks back at small, rude world of our favourite tiny toys
Little men straddle LOHAN, attend tiny G20 Summit... ah, sweet memories...
Lego is the TOOL OF SATAN, thunders Polish priest
New minifigs like Monster Fighters are turning kids to the dark side
Dark SITH LORD 'Darth Vader' joins battle to rule, er, Ukraine
Only I can 'make an empire out of a republic' intones presidential candidate
Chinese company counters pollution by importing fresh air
Citizens line up for bags of that sweet, sweet mountain air
Google asks April Fools: Want a job? Be our 'Pokemon Master'
Mountain View is prankin' like it's 1999...
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
SANS - Survey on application security programs
In this whitepaper learn about the state of application security programs and practices of 488 surveyed respondents, and discover how mature and effective these programs are.