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BBC drugs site stoned by reactionists

It's witch-hunt week here in the UK

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Tired of trying to get innocent people lynched by crazed paedophile-hunting gangs, The Daily Mail has turned on the BBC with a front-page rant at its Radio 1 Web site.

In its Essentials section on the site, Radio 1 has made the mistake of providing balanced information on illegal drugs. The justifying opening paragraph on the site was seized upon as an example of just how immoral the BBC has become: "It's summertime and for most of us that means sun, sea, sex, dancing and parties. Summer parties will inevitably bring you into contact with drugs. This section is a guide to the drugs you might come into contact with - it's important that you know what you're getting into, and that every decision you make is informed."

We had a trawl through the site and were actually fairly impressed with the balance achieved. A large array of links are given and the emphasis is on education rather than repeating hysterical claims or conversely giving drugs and air of excitement and mystery.

This may be good for rational human beings and also for the teenagers themselves, but it is too much to take for the Mail and its array of like-minded "experts". Why educate when we can pretend the situation doesn't exist? Plus everyone knows in their heart of hearts that even talking about drugs makes everyone go out and take them and subsequently die.

So up pops Robert Whelan of Family and Youth Concern - the BBC is encouraging illegal activity. Here comes Paul Betts, self-appointed conscience of the nation after his daughter died from drinking too much water after taking an ecstasy pill. Mr Betts informs us that the BBC's claim that young people will inevitably come into contact with drugs is wrong. We can inform him that he is wrong.

We think the Mail is terrific. We value its views on this "permissive propaganda". Mostly because it reminds us that you can't take reasoning and commonsense for granted. ®

Related Link

The BBC drugs site

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