Feeds

RIP grants rights to spies who employ us

Govt. invites comments

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

The Essential Guide to IT Transformation

The DTI has given the British public until the end of the month to submit comments on the Government's plans to let bosses read staff emails without consent.

While MPs are making the most of their summer recess and swanning off on holiday or honeymoon, employers, trade associations, charities and individuals have been given three-and-a-half weeks to complete a DTI questionnaire on this controversial part of the Regulation of Investigatory Powers (RIP) Act.

The DTI consultation paper was launched on 1 August in relation to draft regulations on the RIP Act - which received Royal Assent on 28 July. The deadline for voluntary responses and comments to the paper is 25 August.

The paper involves a less-publicised part of RIP. The Government proposes to make "Lawful Business Practice" Regulations under Section 4(2) of RIP - these will set out the circumstances in which bosses can legally read employees' emails.

According to RIP, businesses must have "reasonable grounds for believing that correspondents have consented to the interception". However, there are quite wide-ranging exceptions to the rule, outlined in the consultation paper, where bosses will be free to intercept emails without consent.

These include:

  • Providing evidence of a commercial transaction.
  • Providing evidence of other business communications to establish facts or ascertain compliance with regulatory practices or procedures.</<li>
  • Audits.
  • Debt recovery.
  • And the more worrying "dispute resolution".

Management will also be able to nose around email correspondence in the interests of "preventing or detecting crime", such as protecting a network against viruses or hackers or when investigating fraud or corruption.

A DTI representative said it had contacted more than 1300 interested parties about the paper, which is available on the DTI Website.

When asked if three and a half weeks was long enough for the British public to air their views on the proposals, especially as it is mid-holiday season and many people will not be at work, the representative answered: "We regret that the response period is limited to this period of time."

She added the time allotted had also been limited due to delays in developing the draft regulations and the fact that RIP got rushed through Parliament very quickly.

According to the DTI, the Secretary of State will make the new regulations in September following comments on the consultation paper, and the RIP Act and regulations will come into force in October. ®

Related Stories

The Spy who Employed Me
Congress meekly addresses workplace surveillance
Email: spammers, hoaxers, workers, watchers
How to dodge RIP
RIP Bill Full coverage

HP ProLiant Gen8: Integrated lifecycle automation

More from The Register

next story
BBC goes offline in MASSIVE COCKUP: Stephen Fry partly muzzled
Auntie tight-lipped as major outage rolls on
iPad? More like iFAD: We reveal why Apple fell into IBM's arms
But never fear fanbois, you're still lapping up iPhones, Macs
White? Male? You work in tech? Let us guess ... Twitter? We KNEW it!
Grim diversity numbers dumped alongside Facebook earnings
Bose says today is F*** With Dre Day: Beats sued in patent battle
Music gear giant seeks some of that sweet, sweet Apple pie
Amazon Reveals One Weird Trick: A Loss On Almost $20bn In Sales
Investors really hate it: Share price plunge as growth SLOWS in key AWS division
There's NOTHING on TV in Europe – American video DOMINATES
Even France's mega subsidies don't stop US content onslaught
You! Pirate! Stop pirating, or we shall admonish you politely. Repeatedly, if necessary
And we shall go about telling people you smell. No, not really
Too many IT conferences to cover? MICROSOFT to the RESCUE!
Yet more word of cuts emerges from Redmond
Chips are down at Broadcom: Thousands of workers laid off
Cellphone baseband device biz shuttered
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.