Feeds

Iraq's first Internet café opens up the world

Of course it doesn't, you're not allowed to see anything

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Security for virtualized datacentres

Iraq has seen its first ever Internet café open. Set up by the enterprising Ba'athist government - which is headed of course by the West's best friend and man of the people Saddam Hussein - the café is another great example of how the Internet can bring us all together, make us more tolerant of other people's views and cultures. Yah right.

In a country where foreign TV is blocked because it is the "wrong" TV (it's kinda like the UK being run by a scarier, madder form of British Rail), where satellite dishes and modems are in fact illegal and only a visit to the Ministry of Information will get you permission for a fax machine, this Internet café is a revelation.

Or it would be if it wasn't prohibitively expensive. An hour's surfing costs 65p (hang on! That's cheaper than my ISP) which isn't so bad until you consider the average Iraqi makes £3 a month. We reckon this equates to about £220 for an hour's surfing.

Of course, you are free to view any Web sites (for that bloody money you'd want T1 hardcore porn within two seconds) as long as they're the right ones (shit). You'll also be comforted by the fact that the café's ISP is none other than the Ministry of Culture and Information. The Iraqi communications minister has vowed to set up more such cafes in Baghdad and other major cities, bringing Iraq up to date with the Internet revolution. We wonder where he's going to get the computers from seeing as most of the world is still pressing massive embargoes on the country.

That said, we reckon The Register would get through the censors. If Iraq doesn't like those outlets that hype up the Western view of life and congratulate themselves in the trappings of consumerism, we should be allowed through by default. So, if you are one of those in Baghdad and you're reading this, we'd like to send out our warmest greetings and of course apologise for the £10 it's just cost you to read this. ®

Related story

Chinese cybercafes dubbed 'electronic heroin'

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

More from The Register

next story
The 'fun-nification' of computer education – good idea?
Compulsory code schools, luvvies love it, but what about Maths and Physics?
Ex-US Navy fighter pilot MIT prof: Drones beat humans - I should know
'Missy' Cummings on UAVs, smartcars and dying from boredom
Facebook, Apple: LADIES! Why not FREEZE your EGGS? It's on the company!
No biological clockwatching when you work in Silicon Valley
Happiness economics is bollocks. Oh, UK.gov just adopted it? Er ...
Opportunity doesn't knock; it costs us instead
'Cowardly, venomous trolls' threatened with TWO-YEAR sentences for menacing posts
UK government: 'Taking a stand against a baying cyber-mob'
Sysadmin with EBOLA? Gartner's issued advice to debug your biz
Start hoarding cleaning supplies, analyst firm says, and assume your team will scatter
Doctor Who's Flatline: Cool monsters, yes, but utterly limp subplots
We know what the Doctor does, stop going on about it already
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.