Feeds

Iraq's first Internet café opens up the world

Of course it doesn't, you're not allowed to see anything

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

Iraq has seen its first ever Internet café open. Set up by the enterprising Ba'athist government - which is headed of course by the West's best friend and man of the people Saddam Hussein - the café is another great example of how the Internet can bring us all together, make us more tolerant of other people's views and cultures. Yah right.

In a country where foreign TV is blocked because it is the "wrong" TV (it's kinda like the UK being run by a scarier, madder form of British Rail), where satellite dishes and modems are in fact illegal and only a visit to the Ministry of Information will get you permission for a fax machine, this Internet café is a revelation.

Or it would be if it wasn't prohibitively expensive. An hour's surfing costs 65p (hang on! That's cheaper than my ISP) which isn't so bad until you consider the average Iraqi makes £3 a month. We reckon this equates to about £220 for an hour's surfing.

Of course, you are free to view any Web sites (for that bloody money you'd want T1 hardcore porn within two seconds) as long as they're the right ones (shit). You'll also be comforted by the fact that the café's ISP is none other than the Ministry of Culture and Information. The Iraqi communications minister has vowed to set up more such cafes in Baghdad and other major cities, bringing Iraq up to date with the Internet revolution. We wonder where he's going to get the computers from seeing as most of the world is still pressing massive embargoes on the country.

That said, we reckon The Register would get through the censors. If Iraq doesn't like those outlets that hype up the Western view of life and congratulate themselves in the trappings of consumerism, we should be allowed through by default. So, if you are one of those in Baghdad and you're reading this, we'd like to send out our warmest greetings and of course apologise for the £10 it's just cost you to read this. ®

Related story

Chinese cybercafes dubbed 'electronic heroin'

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
Kaspersky backpedals on 'done nothing wrong, nothing to fear' blather
Founder (and internet passport fan) now says privacy is precious
TROLL SLAYER Google grabs $1.3 MEEELLION in patent counter-suit
Chocolate Factory hits back at firm for suing customers
Facebook, Google and Instagram 'worse than drugs' says Miley Cyrus
Italian boffins agree with popette's theory that haters are the real wrecking balls
Mozilla's 'Tiles' ads debut in new Firefox nightlies
You can try turning them off and on again
Sit tight, fanbois. Apple's '$400' wearable release slips into early 2015
Sources: time to put in plenty of clock-watching for' iWatch
Facebook to let stalkers unearth buried posts with mobe search
Prepare to HAUNT your pal's back catalogue
Ex-IBM CEO John Akers dies at 79
An era disrupted by the advent of the PC
prev story

Whitepapers

Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.