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Nailbomber's dad gets online to prove his son is mad

Not gay, but "normal", says pops

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The father of the London nailbomber has launched a Website in the hope of proving his convicted murderer son is "mad, not bad".

Stephen Copeland uses the site to slate the police, the press, the jury, one of the psychiatrists at his son's trial, and even the nailbomber's mother and grandmother.

The garishly-coloured Website claims the jurors "acted like spineless puppets" over their decision that David Copeland was not insane when he bombed a gay pub in the heart of London last summer - an incident that killed three people and injured 79.

Meanwhile, Copeland sets the record straight on his son's homophobia, while revealing a few prejudices of his own. Referring to an article that appeared in tabloid The Daily Star, he writes: "They say David is a homosexual himself - this is an absolute lie and defamatory slur, because as his father, I know that he is quite normal, and always has been."

And to prove his son's "normalness", he adds: "They say David's claim that he used prostitutes is false - another lie, as he visited them fairly regularly."

Meanwhile, he happily admits his son is anti-gay - but states that, as his father, he is not to blame. "It was his mother and grandmother who caused his homophobia, by taunting and embarrassing him on several occasions."

OK. So what about the police? Under the heading "Police Deception and Abuse of Authority", Copeland says he has been victimised because of his son. Not only has his prized clay pigeon shooting licence been revoked, but Copeland says he is "sure that if any of them [the police] ever had a brain cell in their head, it would have died from loneliness a long time ago".

More comments on the site centre around the convicted murderer's reported crime-fuelled drug habit - also not true according to his father. "He was only an occasional user of drugs, as many people are these days, and did not have to turn to crime to support it". Copeland adds that his son "only used cannabis, LSD and ecstasy".

Meanwhile, 24-year-old David Copeland - who was a white supremacist that worshipped Adolf Hitler - is serving a total of six life sentences. ®

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