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Intel CuMine drought nearly over

It's not the end, or even the beginning of the end...

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Sources not a light year away from Tech Data, a large US component distributor, tell The Reg that Intel's long-standing problem with supplying Coppermine Pentium IIIs for the desktop appears to be nearly over.

Large quantities are available for most of the price ratings of the Pentium III apart from the 1GHz microprocessor, which, as we have previously reported, is a special case.

However, although there now appears to be good supply on Intel's mid-range CuMines - 700MHz to the 850MHz - the situation is less rosy for the Pentium III/866MHz and the Pentium III/933MHz parts, with only limited quantities expected in the next week or two.

Yesterday we reported adjustments Intel had made to its Coppermine desktop processors, while it readies itself for the release of a 1.13GHz Pentium III at month end in limited quantities, and a positive onslaught of low priced 1GHz Pentium IIIs just in time for Santa Clara's gnomes to stick mobos into peoples' Christmas stockings. ®

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