Feeds

EMI digital music service to debut next week

100 albums, 200 singles on offer

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

EMI, one of the world's 'big five' record labels, will next week release 100 albums and 200 singles as digital downloads to be sold through online music retailers.

EMI announced its service back in April. At the time, it said it would offer the tracks in Microsoft's MediaPlayer format and Liquid Audio's secure MP3-based format. Albums will be priced to match their CD equivalents.

It also said the service would go live on 1 July, so it's only 18 days' late - it will now go live next Tuesday, according to EMI officials cited by the San Jose Mercury (SJM).

Albums on offer include Pink Floyd's Dark Side of the Moon, Frank Sinatra's Songs for Swinging Lovers, Blondie's Parallel Lines and tracks from the Spice Girls, Megadeth, NWA and a host of others. EMI admits the selection isn't exhaustive - it's really just dipping its toe in the online ocean - but it does make a change from the usual rosters of unknowns offered by most Net-based music companies to date.

"We want to learn what the consumers want, how they find the user experience,'' an EMI spokeswoman told the SJM, echoing EMI CEO Ken Berry's comment last April that "digital delivery will eventually become part of our standard release pattern".

In any case, the size of the downloadable tracks and the consequent time it takes to pull them down to a PC will ensure that the digital market is some way off the big time. But the major labels need to be ready for emerging broadband Net connection technologies. Sony has already pulled its Sony Music Entertainment subsidiary - the record label formerly known as CBS - into a Sony Broadband umbrella operation.

Like fellow 'big fiver' BMG, EMI will offer its music not direct but through e-tailers, essentially bringing its traditional sales channel to the online world. Certainly the majors need to keep their High Street outlets happy while they remain their biggest customers. That's unlikely to change for the foreseeable future - even the most enthusiastic market projections put online sales way behind CD purchases.

BMG's service is due to go live later this summer. ®

Related Story

EMI to launch digital music service in July

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

More from The Register

next story
WHY did Sunday Mirror stoop to slurping selfies for smut sting?
Tabloid splashes, MP resigns - but there's a BIG copyright issue here
Spies, avert eyes! Tim Berners-Lee demands a UK digital bill of rights
Lobbies tetchy MPs 'to end indiscriminate online surveillance'
How the FLAC do I tell MP3s from lossless audio?
Can you hear the difference? Can anyone?
Inequality increasing? BOLLOCKS! You heard me: 'Screw the 1%'
There's morality and then there's economics ...
Google hits back at 'Dear Rupert' over search dominance claims
Choc Factory sniffs: 'We're not pirate-lovers - also, you publish The Sun'
EU to accuse Ireland of giving Apple an overly peachy tax deal – report
Probe expected to say single-digit rate was unlawful
While you queued for an iPhone 6, Apple's Cook sold shares worth $35m
Right before the stock took a 3.8% dive amid bent and broken mobe drama
prev story

Whitepapers

A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.