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This week we will be following Channel 4's E-millionaires Show, bringing you our thoughts on the show and the ebusinesses proposed by its 15 contestants.

The winning business will get £1 million to burn. Viewers have the chance of getting an equity stake in the venture.

We are poised, foot drawn back, ready to kick to death any rubbish idea which bags some venture capital. So far there is nothing to match the genius of Flake.com - a portal for breakfast cereal which had its success celebrated on fuckedcompany.com.

Last night's three hopeful's were: com-poser.com; livemoments.com and partyforever.co.uk.

Com-poser.com is designed for people to create, download and buy original music that they compose online. Once your song is recorded, you can buy it on CD or MP3.

Livemoments.com would allow people to attend events, virtually, kind of videoconferencing a wedding ceremony. And finally, Partyforever.com is an online party organiser.

Unfortunately, because of a scheduling clash with Star Trek's Voyager, no-one watched it last night so beyond those barest details there is little to report. The crew of Voyager on the other hand were a busy bunch, but that is a different story altogether.

After the show, mockups of the sites were available to view on the show's homepage, but by the time we got there the links were dead. When we checked back later, they were gone competely. We presume this was to get ready for tonight's contestants, and not a metaphor for the lifespan of ebusinesses these days.

Tonght's contestants are Joe Rajko, Layth Karagholi and Michelle Ritchie who are proposing Youreable.com, Viewahotel.com and Mykindofholiday.com repectively.

The winner of last night's heat will be announced on the show at 8pm GMT tonight. And I promise, I will be watching! ®

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